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Why its hard to get any Athlon past 1.6ghz

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mEKbOY

Member
Joined
May 27, 2001
Location
San Diego, CA
I have done some extensive reading about my 1.4 chip. I have gotten it to 1.62 ghz stable and thats about the highest i have seen anywhere. I just read an article reviewing the 1.4. I find out( which i beleive is true) that just about all athlon chips are the same. Some like the 1ghz etc are just underclocked versions of say a 1.4 or 1.3. Thats why they have been so succesfull at overclocking so well. My stock 1.4 is just as hot as a overclcoked 1gh to the same speed.. why cuz they are virtualy the same chips. I remember reading an article a ways back about AMD and intel doing this to oviously increase sales which has worked. I realy think that anything above say 1.65 will be actualy slowing you down. As far as the Athlons go they have probaly reached there max for the year and AMD will probaly come out with something new ( unlike the MP) next year. Tell me what you guys think.

Mek
 
OP
M

mEKbOY

Member
Joined
May 27, 2001
Location
San Diego, CA
I now have more to back this up. I looked at my cpu info in sisoft utilites and it even says athlon 650-1.2ghz family..when i got my cpu boxed from AMD. They probaly just have the multipliers set to speeds to attain 1.4. I just read another post with soemone thinking that there cpu was a mistake. I feel rather dumb for not realizing this before.. I would have saved myself $100 bucks and got a 1ghz cpu. I guess you live and you learn.. Right.

Mek
 

Flash

Member
Joined
May 21, 2001
Both AMD and Intel have been doing this for years. You're right, there is nothing structurally different between a 1ghz and a 1.4ghz Tbird. What they do is test the chips to see which perform better. When a new chip comes out these speed ratings can be significant, because the production process is new and yields are lower. Towards the end of a product cycle yields go up and the proportion of chips that perform at the highest level go up as well. But the manufacturers don't necessarily change their ratings to reflect this. So, as we are at the end of the Tbird's cycle, it seems that most of the 1ghz and above chips will actually do between 1.4-1.5 with proper cooling. But I'm sure that this isn't universal, and no doubt there are those who bought a 1ghz chip believing it would do 1.4, but it just won't. That's the value of buying a 1.4 (or whatever) rated chip. You are at least guaranteed that it'll reach the rated speed. You pays your money and ya takes you chances.