• Welcome to Overclockers Forums! Join us to reply in threads, receive reduced ads, and to customize your site experience!

Windows 10 stability test on boot?

Overclockers is supported by our readers. When you click a link to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn More.

Psittac

Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
I was just curious if windows 10 performs some sort of extra task on boot when your system has been unstable. I have had solid clock's that boot instantly yet when I start throwing weird settings at the machine it takes "forever" to boot. And this isn't a simple fix of putting it back to conservative clocks that are known to work well, it still takes forever to boot when these profiles are loaded. Any kind of insight here?
 

Kenrou

Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2014
Stable or not Windows should always boot fast on a SSD unless it's memory/SSD/bad software throwing errors, what do you have on startup ?
 

Vishera

Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2013
what does this mean?

I would assume he means changing voltages and DRAM timings? No way to tell for sure though until OP responds. Psittac, if the weird settings you refer to are messing with overclocks, or voltages, tell us what the values were when it was "normal" and what the FIRST value entry was that made it start taking longer to boot.

--Edit--
One thing I forgot to add, if undoing the overclocks doesn't fix it, then you could have damaged your memory chips. As Kenrou said, bad RAM can affect boot performance. Have you blue screened at all?
 
OP
P

Psittac

Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
I would assume he means changing voltages and DRAM timings? No way to tell for sure though until OP responds. Psittac, if the weird settings you refer to are messing with overclocks, or voltages, tell us what the values were when it was "normal" and what the FIRST value entry was that made it start taking longer to boot.

--Edit--
One thing I forgot to add, if undoing the overclocks doesn't fix it, then you could have damaged your memory chips. As Kenrou said, bad RAM can affect boot performance. Have you blue screened at all?

Ok the bad ram makes the most sense. For the past couple day's I have had my ram only register 6 sticks every now and then. And by weird settings I mean upping settings that may make it unstable. I haven't blue screened per say but I have had the "oop's we ran into a problem" screen once or twice, but that's to be expected when getting unstable. I'll do some memory tests. But at the same time I can run 8hr's real bench stable so you'd think bad ram wouldn't let that happen.
 

Vishera

Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2013
Ok the bad ram makes the most sense. For the past couple day's I have had my ram only register 6 sticks every now and then. And by weird settings I mean upping settings that may make it unstable. I haven't blue screened per say but I have had the "oop's we ran into a problem" screen once or twice, but that's to be expected when getting unstable. I'll do some memory tests. But at the same time I can run 8hr's real bench stable so you'd think bad ram wouldn't let that happen.

Bad RAM can take months to rear its head full force. My friend built his PC without grounding himself a year and a half ago AND overclocked his RAM. He set the voltages a tiny bit higher than was necessary for his overclock and it just now started acting up. PC shop confirmed the chips had suffered electrical damage. The "oops" screen, does it have a sad emoticon on it? Because in Windows 10 that's what the BSoD looks like.
 
OP
P

Psittac

Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
Yeah it's the emoticon screen. I'm rather familiar with blue screening due to unstable clock's. That's not the part that worries me. What worries me is earlier the windows loading screen took maybe two or three seconds, now it's up to 30-45 seconds. I just pulled out the two sticks that don't always register and still no change. Potential thing's I have done that might contribute to this, I used ccleaner to clean the registry, which I have done countless times before. The Samsung 950 was imaged off the non-nvme Samsung m.2 I was using prior. The page file is on a separate ssd. Going back to default settings in bios makes no impact.
 

Vishera

Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2013
How did you image it? Did you take it to a shop or do it yourself? The image could have been corrupted/damaged, or your SSD could be bad. Another guy has a thread about the same problem, windows being extremely sluggish, and the guys that helped him in his thread said it was most likely the SSD was bad. I'm not sure if having the page file on a separate drive would have anything to do with it...but if default everything in BIOS and removing two sticks of RAM that have a tendency to not register didn't fix it, I'd start looking into having your SSD replaced. First off though, try re-cloning the non-nvme drive and see if it gets any better.
 
OP
P

Psittac

Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
well, I would agree with you, however the cloning went without a hitch. I used Samsung's program and it wasn't until much later that this started. Also the system runs just fine once I'm into it, for some reason it's just that loading screen
 

caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
ram will cause all kinds of issues, download and run memtest on each stick.
winten just loves to corrupt, when I bench winten I have an ssd with a fresh install that I clone 4-5 copys of, with win7 I would change drives every 3rd bsod, with winten it's every bsod.
 
OP
P

Psittac

Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
sounds good, I have run a couple hours of memtest with no error's, but that isn't extensive enough. I'm hoping it's an OS corruption because that's a far easier fix. Maybe I'll try a reinstall. The only problem with that would be that if it is in fact my ram, I need to know sooner than later so I can return it to micro center instead of relying on an RMA through corsair. Maybe I could swing an upgrade if I'm doing a replacement. Only problem with that solution is the fact that I don't have the time to test each stick thoroughly, I can run at night, and I can run while I'm at work, but when I'm hope I want a responsive computer (or even a useable one with memtest in mind)(maybe start with these two stick's that don't register in bios every time). Anyways thank's everyone for the thoughts, I just need to put some time and effort into finding the source here. I am still open to any thought's and opinions, just wanted to say thank you.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
ram will cause all kinds of issues, download and run memtest on each stick.
winten just loves to corrupt, when I bench winten I have an ssd with a fresh install that I clone 4-5 copys of, with win7 I would change drives every 3rd bsod, with winten it's every bsod.
thats....wow. haven't had much trouble myself.

Anyways there isn't a stress test loading windows. If you are at stock speeds all around, I'd try a fresh, not cloned, reinstall.
 
OP
P

Psittac

Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
I ran 6.5hrs of memtest today with zero errors with all 8 sticks. Next I'll run the two problem sticks over night.
 
OP
P

Psittac

Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
ok so the problem was with the motherboard, replaced it today with an x99 sabertooth and it's fine, didn't even reinstall windows but I will be doing that soon. What I figured out was, every time I changed a setting or a piece of hardware, it would load windows slow until I rebooted a couple times, then it would work fine. I could do any combination of memory sticks and I had to cold boot it a hand full of times and it would sort things out.
 

Vishera

Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2013
ok so the problem was with the motherboard, replaced it today with an x99 sabertooth and it's fine, didn't even reinstall windows but I will be doing that soon. What I figured out was, every time I changed a setting or a piece of hardware, it would load windows slow until I rebooted a couple times, then it would work fine. I could do any combination of memory sticks and I had to cold boot it a hand full of times and it would sort things out.

Just curious, how did you come down to the conclusion it was the board? Process of elimination?
 
OP
P

Psittac

Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
Just curious, how did you come down to the conclusion it was the board? Process of elimination?

I had suspected the RAM because on occasion some of the stick's wouldn't show in bios. So I decided it was finally time to get to the bottom of which ram stick it was that was throwing the system off. Other's had suggested that the ram was very suspect in slow boots as well. So I got down a solid strategy for testing each stick and each combination of sticks, single dual triple quad channel ect. My finding's didn't really make sense until I decided to test each config a couple times (only looking for post and speed of boot). Turned out that if something were to change, be it ram configuration or any setting in BIOS, the boot time would go from 3 seconds to 45+ seconds, no other impact on performance. If I were to swap one stick in A1 for another stick in A1 it would boot just fine. But for some reason if I didn't change anything and did a couple cold boot's it would sort it's self out and it would be back to normal. Since no particular piece of ram acted any different than any other piece I came to the conclusion that it must be something to do with the BIOS, which my BIOS was already the newest. The system didn't like posting all the time early on when I got it and kind of acted funny every now and then since being built. But I'm feeling confident with this new board