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With or Without a resivoir...

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Tacoman667

Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2001
Location
Kingwood, TX
I bleed my tubes so that NO air is in the loop but it seems that after a day or 2 I got the air back in. Not alot but enough I can see the stream in the center of the tubes. Do I need a resivoir to eliminate this problem or what? Where is this air comming from? My setup is completely sealed. I am so confused...
 

bdf24

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2001
Location
Harford, WI.
Well you would have to go thru and check where the leak is coming from. I would pay very close attention to where the tube is connected to the in side of the pump or the pump itself.
I think a reservoir would fix your problem as the air would have some place to go. But I prefer running without a reservoir. Less stuff to worry about and more consistant temps in my opinion.
 

Thelemac

Administratively Deficient
Joined
Mar 15, 2001
How are you bleeding your tubing? I'm guessing that you still have air in there. I know I do. I have to top off my fill line every couple of days...will have to until I get rid of all of the air bubbles.
 
OP
T

Tacoman667

Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2001
Location
Kingwood, TX
Welp, I figured screw it and made a little resivoir. It works really well and I think I actually dropped 1-2C idle. I just made it outta a tupperware container and cut the holes myself. Used the neoprene that I got in my DD kit to seal it for now and set my pump on a box so it won't have a hard time pumping.
 

Petar

Registered
Joined
May 20, 2001
Location
Belgrade, Serbia
I do not believe that there is water vapor in your system - how high has the water temperature to go before it starts vaporizing anyway?

IMHO, it is better to have more water in a circuit (in the reservoir, of course) because it means higher thermal capacity.
 
L

lightning

Guest
it's good to have more water in the reservior but it also took more time to cool it down to too!! :)
 

Petar

Registered
Joined
May 20, 2001
Location
Belgrade, Serbia
Sorry, but I think that you're wrong about this. The time for cooling of the water does not depend on the quantity, but on the heat that it had absorbed...the latter being in connection with the CPU dissipation only.
 

Thelemac

Administratively Deficient
Joined
Mar 15, 2001
Petar (May 20, 2001 02:36 a.m.):
IMHO, it is better to have more water in a circuit (in the reservoir, of course) because it means higher thermal capacity.

Well, sure, it can hold more, but it doesn't matter if you don't get rid of it as quickly as you get it, cause the cpu constantly gives off heat, which, of course, fills up whatever heat capacity there is. So having more water will just make it take longer for the water to heat up...it will heat up, though.

The only way more water could help was if you were to expose a lot of it's surface so that it could give off the heat.
 

bdf24

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2001
Location
Harford, WI.
I dont know about you guys, But I got much better results running a closed loop system as opposed to using a reservoir.
 
L

lightning

Guest
thelemac is right!!! from the thermodynamic and heat transfer class that i took before told me if a substance hold more energy(heat), it need more expose surface to dissipate the energy and i had check that water has 4200J/kg.K, which mean 1kg of water @20C store about 4200J. more water equal to more weight!! and the total energy store inside the fluid also will increase. if ur cooling capability are limit to cool 1 kg of water @ 40C(for example) to 20C in 20min. now it took more time to settle it down!! yes!! i do agree it also take longer time to get to equilibrium temp but enventually it will. all the assumption are made from negligeble of conduction & convection heat transfer from the reservior coz it seem like u will not likely to use a fan to cool the reservior. :) what i'm trying to said is be wise to use a suitable amount of water will work better then more!! somemore, more water equal to more space occupied!! :)
 

Petar

Registered
Joined
May 20, 2001
Location
Belgrade, Serbia
Thelemac (May 20, 2001 10:28 a.m.):

Well, sure, it can hold more, but it doesn't matter if you don't get rid of it as quickly as you get it, cause the cpu constantly gives off heat, which, of course, fills up whatever heat capacity there is. So having more water will just make it take longer for the water to heat up...it will heat up, though.

The only way more water could help was if you were to expose a lot of it's surface so that it could give off the heat.



You are right about this. However, I was thinking about the identical system with and without the reservoir. If the radiator is capable of cooling the water in the system without the reservoir, it will surely be able to cool the water from the reservoir (larger amount of water) since, AFAIK, the temperature of the larger amount of water will not go as high as the smaller one.