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WPA2-PSK

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buffheman

Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2008
Is this a common encryption? My network just changed to this, and I don't think any of my hardware is compatible. I have a Dell laptop that I got a few years ago, and a Belkin MIMO G+ wireless usb adapter for my desktop, neither of which will connect due to incorrect encryption type. But when I got to properties, AES and TKIP are the only options for encryption type under WPA2-Personal.

The only way I can connect is with my old Linksys wireless adapter. But it's too cruddy to pick up my weak signal. And even that registers it as a WEP encryption for whatever reason.

Or is PSK not even an encryption type? I am confused... I just want interent.
 
Last edited:

meionm

Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2004
Are you running windows xp on it? If so you need to download update from microsoft for WPA2

Also since this is recent change, you might have it saved as something else on your computer. Right now you have wpa2 but you might have saved as wpa1 on your computer. Delete existing connection and connect again.
 
OP
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buffheman

Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2008
Ok I will have to try that. I'm running Vista, and I went into properties and changed the security type and all that... I will just delete it though. Unfortunately, this conundrum forced me to come into work today...
 

meionm

Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2004
Since you got vista, open connection manager. Click properties for selected wifi network. There you should be adjust type security. If you changed to wpa2 recently and name of the network remain same, computer still thinks that it is something else.

Also reboot router. Sometimes changes don't go in to effect right away.
 

petteyg359

Likes Popcorn
Joined
Jul 31, 2004
PSK isn't an encryption type, it simply means Pre-Shared Key (you have some set key like "MyNetworkPassword"), as opposed to RADIUS-type authentication, like SecurID cards, where each login requires a unique passcode. AES and TKIP are two different methods of applying the encryption. AES is generally considered more secure.