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Xp 1600+ or P4 1.8A/2.0A

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rizge

Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2002
Location
Cairo, Egypt
which one to get gurus
i read a heck a lot of reviews on both but can't decide yet
the price factor and performance/value is given to the xp BUT i am afraid of the idea of easily crushing the core under the heatsink
we don't have shims here in egypt
With Intel i am afraid(very) from this S.n.d.s. (Sudden Northwood Death Syndrome
I was planning to overclock the soon-to-be-purchased cpu moderately 100~145-160 and with not-so-high-vcore
 

TASOS

Member
Joined
May 16, 2001
Location
Athens Greece
P4 1.8A SL68Q....it's the B0 shrink stepping and it seems to perform very good.
You can even expect to reach 150-160+ fsb with proper cooling.
 

larva

Inactive Moderator
Joined
Jul 12, 2002
well, an AXP 1600+ is definatelely cheaper. The intel chips definately run cooler. Personally I like the DDR chipsets (845e) better than the via products the AXP depends on, but the both work well enough. Don't use shims as it's just a good way to keep the heatsink from seating on the chip fully.

As far as your concerns, unless you are pretty careless you should 't damage either. If you keep the voltage to sane levels the northwood will live a long time (1.65V and below). Poor handling or excessive voltage (live with what the chip wants to run, not what you want it to run) could kill either.

In the end it really matters what your priorities are. If the lowest cost is key, the AXP is quite a bit cheaper. If you like the idea of a little more potential and a cooler running setup that is easier on the power supply, the P4 looks attractive. Neither one is a disaster looking for a place to happen, so you will just have to decide which plays to the concerns most important to you.
 

Neo_peter

Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2002
Location
Toronto, Canada
1.8As can clock to around 2.7ish pretty easily, 2.4 almost guaranteed. so those would all probably shoot down the 1600+ even at 1.8Ghz or so... if cost isn't a very very big factor, the 2.26 is also worth considering. that'll be a great OCer as it has the lowest multiplier.
 

Buzzdog

Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2002
Location
BFE, IN
rizge,

snds should not turn you away from a PIV. As long as you keep your voltage within reason. I would say 1.7 actual and by no means ever over 1.75 actual you should have a long life out of your PIV. The 1.8 is a good chip, I have one. I also have a 2.26 another great chip. Either one of these should do good for you. If you are not in a real hurry then I would wait for c1 steppings to become available for both CPU's. Also if you are patient then you will be able to go with the Granit Bay chipset.

Buzzdog
 
OP
R

rizge

Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2002
Location
Cairo, Egypt
so p4 i go
1.8A or 2.0A
about 20-30$ difference
looking for the one with the highest fsb i can really push to with moderate cooling
 

Neo_peter

Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2002
Location
Toronto, Canada
1.8A and 2.26B are famous for getting great OCs, 2.0A isn't a luck of the draw, well all OCs are luck of the draw, but 2.0A more so..
 
OP
R

rizge

Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2002
Location
Cairo, Egypt
al right
first to clear things up for myself i shouldn'y see any difference in windows and in games when switching from my current cpu(in sig) to the p4 one
i think all the difference will be in the heavy-memory-hogging programs that require a lot of mem bandwidth
BTW
Something i want to know
how to calculate the bandwidth of my current processor
wasn't it (bus width/8 * How much MHZ?)
 

Arkaine23

Captain Random Senior Evil
Joined
Nov 8, 2001
CPU

XP 1600+

Cheap and great OC'er. Will save you more than $100 (US prices anyway) over a P4 system and show no discernible difference. It'll even beat the P4 in some applications where raw calculating power is involved.

I've removed the heatsinks on Athlons a hundred times and never harmed the core. What's more likely is damaging the motherboard when using a screwdriver to push the clip onto the socket- the same clips are used on all heatsinks, Intel and AMD.