How To Fix the Infamous Logitech Double Click Problem


Overclockers is supported by our readers. When you click a link to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn More.

Logitech mouse switch

A common complaint with modern Logitech mice are the switches: unintentional double-clicking, dropping items while dragging, or not registering clicks. I’ve gone through at least six Logitech mice (G500, G700s, G903 Lightspeed) in the past few years; they usually last about a year before failing. In this article, I will show how to replace broken switches with high-quality replacements.

Background

Logitech mice used to be synonymous with high quality. Their mice were well-engineered, used high-quality components, and had good software. The first mouse I owned of theirs was the MX510, and I’ve used no other brand since. Unfortunately, over the past few years, they are compromising quality by using cheaper parts. Common complaints are double-clicking, dropping items while dragging them, or not registering clicks. Over time, the problem gets worse until the mouse is effectively unusable. The failure is due to the primary Omron switches. While the switches are still made by Omron, there are quality differences between switches made in China or in Japan. Your choice is to buy new mice or return the broken ones. I’d much rather fix the problem than spend another $60-$100.

There are many guides online showing how to fix switches without replacing them. It requires disassembling the mouse and Omron switches, then bending a tiny piece of metal. This will temporarily fix the problem, but the problem eventually returns. I also find working with a small piece of metal more difficult than replacing it. Here is the switch compared to a penny for scale.

Internals of an Omron switch
The internal components of an Omron switch, from a G500. The long flat metal piece is both the switching component and the return spring.

With my collection of broken mice, I will show you how to replace switches in the G500, G700s, G903 Lightspeed, and M510. Don’t fret if you don’t have one of these; the steps are likely similar and the switches are almost certainly the same.

Disclaimer

If your mouse is still under warranty, contact Logitech to get a replacement. I shouldn’t need to say this, but opening the mouse and changing the switches will void your warranty. If you break the mouse while attempting to fix it, Logitech will not (and should not) send a replacement. Remember, there is a chance you damage the mouse beyond repair. While writing this article, I broke one of my G500 mice.

While I find replacing these switches easy, and possibly even fun, you may not. Replacing switches will require you to disassemble the mouse – which has many small parts – and to solder in new switches. If you have little to no experience soldering and do not feel confident replacing these switches, I recommend learning and practicing on something less valuable. These guides will be as complete and detailed as I can make them, but I may miss something. You are responsible for making modifications to the mouse, so be careful. We can help you if you get stuck or have a question, so feel free to comment below. Please read all the instructions for your mouse before starting.

Tools and Parts

Switches have a rating for the force required to actuate the switch. Simply put, a higher rating requires more force to push the switch.

I recommend one of the following: Omron D2F-01 (150 gf) or D2F-01F (75 gf). The only difference is the actuating force required to depress the switch. Heavier switches (higher gf) will tend to last longer due to thicker internal components. Buy them from a reputable source, such as DigiKey or Mouser. Avoid eBay and Amazon, as you can’t be certain what you will get. You can use other switch brands as long as it is the same physical size and pinout. Many options are available, but I will not discuss them here.

When I wrote this article, I had been using my fixed G903 Lightspeed with the heavier Omron D2F-01 switches for over six months, and I highly recommend them. The stock switch feels mushy and indecisive in comparison. While I use the word “heavier”, it does not require noticeably increased effort to use the mouse.

Listed below are the tools you will need, with links to products I’ve owned and recommend:

For the G903 Lightspeed, you will need:

  • Replacement Teflon mice “feet”
  • T4 Torx
  • #00 Phillips
  • #000 Phillips

For the G700s, you will need:

  • Replacement Teflon mice “feet”
  • Small flat blade screwdriver (I used 2.5 mm)
  • #0 Phillips

For the G500, you will need:

  • Replacement Teflon mice “feet”
  • Small flat blade screwdriver (I used 2.5 mm)
  • #00 Phillips

For the M510, you will need:

  • #1 Phillips
  • Small flat blade screwdriver (I used 1 mm)

Cost

Luckily, replacement switches are cheap. If you have all of the tools listed above, the repair will cost you around $1.66 per switch and $8 for the Teflon feet, which should be under $15 with shipping. This is, obviously, much cheaper than buying new, and it keeps broken electronics out of landfills. Even if you do not have the tools, they are a good investment and you can use them to repair a wide variety of products.

Repair Instructions

Below are the instructions for each mouse. In each section, I will show you how to disassemble, repair, and reassemble your mouse, with detailed steps and tips along the way. Click on the photos to see a full-size version.

I recommend replacing both switches, even if only one is misbehaving. The extra time to replace a switch on a disassembled mouse is much shorter than having to do all this again when the other inevitably fails.

For clarification, the “front” of the mouse is where the USB connector is or the farthest side away from you when using it normally. Inversely, the “back” of the mouse is closest to you.

G903 Lightspeed

The Logitech G903 Lightspeed was released in 2017, and I’ve owned two since 2018. Out of the many Logitech mice I’ve owned and used over the years, this one is, by far, my favorite. The first mouse lasted around a year before having issues with clicking. The replacement I got from the RMA didn’t even make it three months. These failures combined with my G700s pushed me to fix these mice instead of getting new ones.

While the G903 Lightspeed is my favorite to use, it has not been designed to be easily repaired. Logitech has hidden screws under the sticker and Teflon feet. There is also a screw under the battery, which is held in with an adhesive pad.

To start disassembly, flip the mouse over and turn it off. Remove the Teflon feet with a small flat blade screwdriver. Use a #00 Phillips screwdriver to remove six screws. Four screws are under the Teflon feet, and two are under the sticker. To make assembly easier, leave the screws under the sticker after loosening them. Then, remove the T4 Torx at the front of the mouse.

Split the case, hinging at the back of the mouse. Flip up the white lever holding the amber data cable, then remove the cable. Unplug the battery cable. There is no latch, so pull it straight out. All the work is done in the top half of the mouse, so set the bottom half aside.

This is the unnerving part of the disassembly: we need to remove the lithium-ion battery and it is held in by an adhesive pad. Use a prying tool to remove the battery, doing your best to not bend it too much. This may be obvious to some, but do not use a metal tool to pry the battery out. Puncturing the battery will kill it, and you may have a super-heated problem in your hands. Since the cable will block the removal of the battery, pry from the front of the mouse. Be mindful of the plastic screw pillars next to the battery as they easily break. In the close-up photo, you can see I broke one.

Remove the magnetically attached side buttons on both sides, if you use them. Remove the seven screws holding the top clamshell.

Even with the screws removed, the clamshell is still firmly affixed. Near the side buttons, unhook the clamshell by lifting it up and pulling it out. Once both sides are unhooked, the clamshell comes off.

Remove the four screws holding the main button covers. Once the screws are removed, twist the covers slightly to remove them. Under them, there are four more screws holding the center assembly. I forgot to take a picture, but this assembly has a permanently attached cable, so flip it back out of the way.

Remove the switch cable, then remove the two screws holding the board down. Do the same for the other side. The smaller board makes it difficult to replace the switches since it is awkward to hold and heats up quickly.

Speaking from experience, make sure to install the new switch on the correct side of the board and in the right orientation. Certainly, I, the author of this article, would not install it wrong twice in a row while fixing my own mouse, nor would I glare at the small PCB as it cools below the temperature of the sun.

Now, to start reassembling the mouse. Once the new switches are soldered in, place the board back in the mouse and reinstall the two screws and cable for each side.

Flip the center button cover back to its normal position. Make sure the cables for the Omron switches are not being pinched; they should tuck under the cover. Reinstall the four screws holding the center cover down. Reinstall the main button covers by lining up the metal pin and then simultaneously twisting while pushing down. They should be fairly snug without the screws. Reinstall the four screws holding down the main button covers.

Reinstall the clamshell we removed earlier, and hook the sides into the channel. The clamshell should feel snug without screws installed. Make sure both sides are firmly affixed.

Reinstall the seven clamshell screws, and reinstall the side buttons if you use them.

We wrecked the adhesive pad when removing the battery, but it will still be sticky enough to hold the battery in place. Reinstall the battery, taking note of where the cable is run in the pictures below. Push down lightly on the battery, and it will be secured in place. Check the location of the amber data cable and the battery cable. The data cable has an arm holding it in place, while the battery cable runs under the plastic.

Line up the two halves of the mouse and reconnect the battery cable. For the data connection, make sure the white plastic lever is flipped up and insert the amber data cable. It is important the cable is fully inserted. The cable should look straight, and should not pull out easily.

Reassembly the two halves of the mouse, making sure no cables will be pinched. Even without the screws, the two halves should combine without much pressure, and should feel solid. Reinstall the six Phillips screws on the bottom, then the Torx towards the front. If you remember, there were plastic pillars next to the battery for screws under the sticker. If you broke one or both of them, take the screw out so it doesn’t rattle around. The mouse has plenty of support without them.

Turn on the mouse, connect it to a computer, and verify all features of the mouse are functional. If everything works, good job!

Use isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to clean where the new Teflon feet will go. Once the surface is dry, install the new Teflon feet.

Enjoy your refurbished mouse!

G700s

The Logitech G700s was released in 2013, and I’ve three since 2014. Like the G903 Lightspeed, these mice lasted around a year before having issues with clicking.

This mouse is not difficult to repair, but it does require a fair amount of soldering to get access to the switches.

To start disassembly, flip the mouse over and remove the battery cover, battery, and USB dongle. Remove the Teflon feet with a flat blade screwdriver. Remove the five screws holding the two halves together.

Once the screws are removed, flip the mouse over, and split the casing as shown below. Don’t be too violent; there is a cable connecting the halves. To remove the connector, slip in two flat blade screwdrivers between the housing and connector, then pull the connector out. The arrows show where I slipped in the screwdrivers. Set the top half of the mouse aside.

Next, we need to remove the scroll wheel assembly. One end of the assembly is being held in by a plastic pin. Looking at the pin like in the pictures below, it needs to be moved left to remove. Push on the end with the same screwdriver used to open the mouse. Pull the pin entirely out.

With the hinge removed, there is nothing holding the scroll wheel assembly in. The other end of the assembly is held in by a metal guard. Gently lift the end which had the plastic hinge pin and pull up. The end with the metal guard has two very small springs, so pay attention if they try to escape. Remove the springs. Small tweezers help, but you can certainly do it by hand.

All the screws holding the PCB assembly are now visible. Two screws that held one end of the scroll wheel assembly also double up as support for the middle click switch, and also hold the PCB down. Remove the two screws and the metal guard. Be very careful with this part of the PCB! It is very easy to break.

Then, remove the two screws holding the black plastic scroll wheel standoff, near the middle of the mouse. The screws like to stay in the housing; I left the screw in to ease installation later.

Due to the design of the mouse, we cannot access the screws in the bottom PCB to remove both boards. Instead, we need to desolder the top board to get access to the switches. Use a desoldering pump or braid on the 14 pins. Remove the board by pulling it straight up.

Locate the Omron switches. Each switch has three solder pads on the bottom side of the PCB. Remove the switches and solder in the new ones. Unlike most of the other mice in this article, one switch is turned around. Make sure to install them in the correct orientation or the mouse will not work correctly.

Reinstall the board and make sure it is fully seated. The pins should stick through an equal amount, and the board where the middle click switch is should sit flush with the clear spacer. Solder the 14 pins.

Before we get too far into reassembly, connect the mouse to a computer and verify the new buttons work. Be careful not to touch metal components while it is powered up. If the new buttons are functional, disconnect the mouse and continue with reassembly.

Reinstall the black plastic scroll wheel standoff, and install its screws. Reinstall the middle click metal guard and the two screws holding it down.

Adjust the center scroll wheel sensors so they are vertical. Then, reinstall the very small springs.

Carefully (so as not to lose the springs) install the scroll wheel assembly. Verify the clear plastic is below the metal guard. Then, install the plastic pin on the backside.

Get the top half of the mouse we set aside, and install the connector. Verify it is fully seated.

Assemble the two halves of the mouse, being careful not to pinch any wires. The two halves should easily clip together. Reinstall the 5 screws, battery, and battery cover. Connect the mouse to a computer, and verify all features of the mouse are functional. If so, good job!

Use isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to clean where the new Teflon feet will go. Once the surface is dry, install the new Teflon feet.

Enjoy your refurbished mouse!

G500

The Logitech G500 was released in 2009 and was widely used by gamers as an upgrade to the MX510. I’ve owned at least two, and they have been reliable even under heavy use. Around 2019, I noticed some errant double clicks and replaced it with a G903 Lightspeed. The stock switches in this mouse seem to be higher quality than newer ones, considering the time and abuse they’ve been through. While disassembling your mouse, check if the PCB is cracked around the middle button switch. If it is, be very careful when applying pressure, as you may break it, as I did.

To reach the internals of the mouse, we need to disassemble the casing. Flip the mouse over and remove the weight tray, if you use it. Then, remove the Teflon feet with a flat blade screwdriver. Since we are replacing the Teflon feet with new ones, don’t worry about damaging them. Once the feet are removed, remove the four obvious screws. The final screw is under the sticker, next to the Logitech logo.

Once the screws are removed, flip the mouse right way up. With the USB cable away from you, pry on the bottom right side and hinge towards the left side. We do this because there is a ribbon cable between the side switches and the main PCB. Flip the retention lever up to release the cable.

If you violently separated the casing or open the wrong side, the cable may rip out. I’ve done this at least once, and it doesn’t seem to break anything, but still, be careful.

To get better access to the PCB, we will remove the red weight retainer housing. There are three screws: one on the left, one on the right, and one in the bottom center. Remove the three screws and pull straight up to remove the housing.

The other end of the ribbon cable is behind the weight retainer housing we just removed. Flip the retention lever up to release the cable. Turn the mouse around so the USB cable is facing you. To prevent pinching the cable, there is a guide that holds it in place. It is being held in by small plastic protrusions. Take note for later, when we reinstall it. To remove the USB cable, simply pull up.

To get better access to the PCB assembly, we need to unscrew it from the bottom casing. Unfortunately, the screws are hidden under the scroll wheel assembly, so we need to remove it first. One end of the assembly is being held in by a plastic pin. Looking at the pin like in the pictures below, it needs to be moved left to remove. Push on the end with the same screwdriver used to open the mouse. Pull the pin entirely out.

With the hinge removed, there is nothing holding the scroll wheel assembly in. The other end of the assembly is held in by a metal guard. Gently lift the end which had the plastic hinge pin and pull up. The end with the metal guard has two very small springs, so pay attention if they try to escape. Remove the springs. Small tweezers help, but you can certainly do it by hand.

All the screws holding the PCB assembly are now visible. Two screws that held one end of the scroll wheel assembly also double up as support for the middle click switch, and also hold the PCB down. Remove the two screws and the metal guard. Be very careful with this part of the PCB! Over years of use, mine had cracked the PCB and the first mouse I started writing this article with snapped the section clean off. Even if yours does not appear to be cracked, the PCB is still thin, so take care!

This is the point where I retrieved my backup mouse to finish this section.

Remove the two screws holding the black plastic scroll wheel standoff, near the middle of the mouse. The screws like to stay in the housing; I left the screws in to ease installation later.

At this point, you have two options:

  1. Desolder the two PCBs. If you are comfortable soldering, separating the boards will be easier. See the G700s instructions for an example.
  2. Keep them together, which is what I’ll do for this mouse.

Remove the two final screws holding the PCB in. One screw is located near the ribbon cable we disconnected earlier. The other is located below the middle click button, on the bottom PCB.

With all the screws removed, we can take out the PCB assembly. There is a piece of clear plastic under the middle click button, which will fight you a little bit to remove. Only friction holds it in place. I used a flat blade screwdriver to get some leverage. Again, be careful with this thin section of the PCB! The PCB assembly will move up with the clear plastic piece, and once it is removed, everything will come out of the case.

Locate the two Omron switches. Each switch has three solder pads on the bottom side (between the PCB assembly) of the PCB. To make removal easier, I recommend adding a small amount of lead-based solder, which lowers the melting point and will make it easier to remove.

If you decided to not desolder the two PCBs, you can still access the solder pads for the switches; it will just be a tight fit.

For each pad, heat the solder until it melts, and use the desoldering pump to remove as much solder as you can. Ideally, you want to remove it all, but with little room, it is ok to leave some solder. If you were able to remove all the solder, the switch should easily slide out of the holes.

If it doesn’t, don’t worry! You can either add more solder, then remove it with the desoldering pump, or you can “walk” the component off. To walk a component out of the holes, heat one solder pad and while the solder is molten, apply force to lift the component. While lifting the component, remove the soldering iron to harden the solder, which will hold the component in a raised position. Repeat for the other side of the component, and repeat until the switch can be removed. Avoid using a screwdriver to lift the switch: there are traces nearby that are easy to break. When I wrote this review, I had to walk both switches off the PCB.

This is the most tricky and frustrating part of the repair, but I believe in you!

With both switches are removed, we need to install and solder the new ones. To make installation easier, I recommend installing the switch and soldering one pin of the component, instead of all three. Check the switch to make sure it is flush with the PCB.  Before soldering the other pins, double-check the switch is installed in the correct direction. The white “tab” of the switch should be near the edge of the PCB. Use the photo from the previous section to verify its orientation is correct.

Once you are sure the switch is installed correctly, solder the remaining pins. Do the same for the other switch. Before you continue, check the solder pads to make sure you have the right amount of solder, and check the solder isn’t bridged between pins. It should look like this:

Before we start reassembly, you can check the functionality of the switches. Plug the mouse into a computer, being careful to not touch any metal on the PCB assembly. Check if the left and right-click are working as normal. If they are not, check the orientation of the switch and the solder joints.

Once you have tested the switches, we can start reassembly. Start by placing the PCB assembly in the bottom mouse case, but don’t press it all the way down. Install the clear plastic spacer between the PCBs and press it down until it is flush with the black support pillar. Press the PCB assembly into the case. Be careful not to pinch the USB cable.

Install the two screws into the bottom PCB. One is near the ribbon cable, the other is under the middle click switch.

Attach the metal plate around the middle click switch, and install the screws. Attach the black plastic support for the scroll wheel, and install the screws.

Reinstall the small springs, and be careful not to lose them.

Check the alignment of the scroll wheel sensor. They are the components inside of the main switches; one is black and the other is clear. They should stand straight up. In the picture below, you can see mine was slightly angled in.

Reinstall the scroll wheel assembly. Make sure the front is under the metal tab.

Reinstall the scroll wheel pin. The pin should slightly stick out the right side and go through the clear plastic of the scroll wheel assembly.

Reinstall the ribbon cable. The blue side of the cable should face the locking clip. The white stripe across the blue will help verify it is fully installed. Push the ribbon cable in until the white stripe is barely visible, then engage the lock. If the cable is fully installed, you should see not see the white stripe.

Reinstall the USB cable in its guide. Make sure it is fully seated below the small plastic protrusions. It should sit flat on the bottom. Then, reinstall the red weight housing, installing three screws.

We are almost done, but this is a tricky step. Imagine how difficult it was to hold the pieces together and take the picture with one hand. Reinstall the other end of the ribbon cable in the top mouse casing. As before, the white stripe should not be visible after engaging the lock.

Assemble the two halves of the mouse casing, then reinstall the five screws. With the mouse nearly assembled, test the mouse again and make sure all the buttons and scroll wheel work. If everything works, great!

Use isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to clean where the new Teflon feet will go. Once the surface is dry, install the new Teflon feet.

Enjoy your refurbished mouse!

Bonus footage to repair my remaining G500 middle-click switch. The original mouse I started repairing for this guide had a functioning middle click button, but this one did not. In the photos above, you can see the middle-click switch is dimpled in. I used a heat gun to remove the functional switch and soldered it to the working mouse. However, the middle switch still did not work, because, like the first one, the PCB was cracked and severed the PCB trace. The smallest wire I had on hand was 26 AWG, which barely fits. I’d recommend something smaller if you have it.

 

M510

The Logitech M510 was released in 2010 and is a cheap wireless non-gaming mouse, which runs off two AA batteries. I do not own the mouse in the photos below, but it seems to be well made from my short time I had with it. Except for the switches, of course. This mouse is very simple to repair, compared to the other mice in this article. You do not need to remove the feet to open this mouse.

To reach the internals of the mouse, we need to separate the top and bottom halves. Flip the mouse over and remove the battery door, batteries, and USB wireless dongle.

Two screws are holding the halves together, and they are hidden under the battery flap. Use a Phillips #1 to remove them. Starting from the battery compartment, pull the two halves apart. It will take more force than you expect.

With the mouse split, sit the top half aside. Next, remove the scroll wheel assembly by pulling straight up. If you accidentally removed the scroll wheel spring, I’ve included a photo to show how it is installed.

Remove the battery cable connector from the board. This connector has small latches, so you can’t pull it straight out. To remove the connector, slip in two flat blade screwdrivers between the housing and connector, then pull the connector out. The arrows show where I slipped in the screwdrivers. Then, remove the lone screw holding the board in, opposite the battery connector.

With the screw removed, the board is being held in by two latches. Carefully push the latch away from the board while pulling the board up. Once the board is passed the latch, do the same on the other side. Pull the board up and out to remove it from the mouse casing. The optical sensor is part of the board assembly, do not remove it from the board.

With the board removed, replacing the Omron switches is easy. Remove the old ones and solder in the new ones. Once the new switches are installed, verify the scroll wheel sensors are parallel, like in the first photo. The sensors are between the Omron switches; one is black, the other is white/clear.

Before installing the board, we need to reinstall the power switch. It will go in backward, but it will be stuck. In the second photo, note how the orientation of the switch tabs are compared to the rest of the casing.

Install the board, and push it down to clip it in. Reinstall the battery connector and the screw on the other side.

Reinstall the scroll wheel assembly. Clip the two halves of the mouse back together, then reinstall the screws in the battery compartment. Verify the mouse works, and you are done!

Final Thoughts

I hope you found this guide helpful and were able to repair your mouse! As you can see, for well under $20 and less than an hour’s worth of time, you can save yourself a lot of money fixing your mouse instead of buying another. Not only is it satisfying to do so, but it also saves precious landfill space from discarded electronics. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask for help on the forums.

– Corey Bodoh (Thideras)

About Corey Bodoh 3 Articles
I'm an author for the Overclockers front page and a moderator on the forums. I love working with server equipment and software, along with overclocking, programming, and general tinkering.

Discussion

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*


  1. I've had a fair amount of Logitech mice over the years (including the M570 trackball). Currently using an MX Revolution on my desktop and a G402 as a laptop/mobile mouse. Only button issue was on an OG G5 that was knocked off the desk once too many, but will keep this thread in mind if anything comes up.