How To Fix the Infamous Logitech Double Click Problem


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Logitech mouse switch

A common complaint with modern Logitech mice is the switches used in the main mouse buttons: when attempting to single click, or drag, you may be experiencing unintentional double-clicking issues, dropping items while dragging, or not registering clicks. I’ve gone through at least six different mice (G500, G700s, G903 Lightspeed) in the past few years; the hardware usually lasts about a year before failing. In this article, I will show how to replace broken switches with high-quality replacements to fix the infamous Logitech double click.

Background

Logitech mice used to be synonymous with high quality. Their mice were well-engineered, used high-quality components, and had good software. The first mouse I owned of theirs was the MX510, and I’ve used no other brand since. Unfortunately, over the past few years, they are compromising quality by using cheaper parts. Common complaints are double-clicking, dropping items while dragging them, or not registering clicks. Over time, the problem gets worse until the mouse is effectively unusable. The failure is due to the primary Omron switches and it does not matter if this is a wired mouse or a wireless mouse. After a number of cycles, the actuation spring loses tension and does not make good contact. Due to this root cause, the issue typically first presents itself on the left mouse button as it is the main button used to click items.

While the switches are still made by Omron, there are quality differences between switches made in China and Japan. Your choice is to buy new mice or return the broken ones. I’d much rather fix the problem than spend another $60-$100.

There are many guides online showing how to fix switches without replacing them. It requires disassembling the mouse and Omron switches, then bending a tiny piece of metal, the copper spring. This will temporarily fix the problem, but the problem eventually returns. I also find working with a small piece of metal more difficult than replacing it.

Other sites suggest software fixes, such as reducing your double-clicking speed in the control panel or mouse settings. This is simply a band-aid fix and does not address the root cause. As the issue worsens, software fixes will no longer compensate. Unfortunately, this isn’t a quick mouse drivers, download, or slider fix.

Here is the switch compared to a penny for scale.

Internals of an Omron switch
The internal components of an Omron switch, from a G500. The long flat metal piece is both the switching component and the return spring.

With my collection of broken mice, I will show you how to replace switches in the G500, G700s, G903 Lightspeed, and M510. Don’t fret if you don’t have one of these; the steps are likely similar and the switches are almost certainly the same.

Disclaimer

If your mouse is still under warranty, contact Logitech to get a replacement. I shouldn’t need to say this, but opening the mouse and changing the switches will void your warranty. If you break the mouse while attempting to fix it, Logitech will not (and should not) send a replacement. Remember, there is a chance you damage the mouse beyond repair. While writing this article, I broke one of my G500 mice.

While I find replacing these switches easy, and possibly even fun, you may not. Replacing switches will require you to disassemble the mouse – which has many small parts – and solder in new switches. If you have little to no experience soldering and do not feel confident replacing these switches, I recommend learning and practicing on something less valuable. These guides will be as complete and detailed as I can make them, but I may miss something. You are responsible for making modifications to the mouse, so be careful. We can help you if you get stuck or have a question, so feel free to comment below. Please read all the instructions for your mouse before starting.

About Corey Bodoh 3 Articles
I'm an author for the Overclockers front page and a moderator on the forums. I love working with server equipment and software, along with overclocking, programming, and general tinkering.

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WhitehawkEQ

Premium Member

3,360 messages 369 likes
freakdiablo

5,184 messages 280 likes

I've had a fair amount of Logitech mice over the years (including the M570 trackball). Currently using an MX Revolution on my desktop and a G402 as a laptop/mobile mouse. Only button issue was on an OG G5 that was knocked off the desk once too many, but will keep this thread in mind if anything comes up.

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bilbobaggins

New Member

2 messages 3 likes

Thanks for this outstanding tutorial. I replaced the switches on two of my M510 mice after first trying to bend the copper piece and breaking the switch's cover. You're right, the desoldering step was the most difficult. One of my mice was older and had a ribbon I had to remove but found a walkthrough on youtube. I was actually surprised these worked with my amateur soldering skills.

I bought 10 of the heavier duty switches from DigiKey but if I had to do over again would've gotten the lighter D2F-01F ones. While the D2F-01 may last longer, I click all day and can notice some finger fatigue. Hopefully won't get carpal finger. Probably didn't make financial sense doing this for a $30 mouse but was a fun project, and am glad I now know how to fix them cuz the switches they come with will definitely fail within a couple years.

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bilbobaggins

New Member

2 messages 3 likes

As a follow-up, I replaced with D2F-01F switches and they feel WAY better.

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ssjwizard

Has slightly less legible writing than Thideras

5,556 messages 86 likes

I've had a fair amount of Logitech mice over the years (including the M570 trackball). Currently using an MX Revolution on my desktop and a G402 as a laptop/mobile mouse. Only button issue was on an OG G5 that was knocked off the desk once too many, but will keep this thread in mind if anything comes up.

I absolutely LOVED my MX revolution. Unfortunately it was placed on its charging cradle after being cleaned without properly drying and killed it!

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freakdiablo

5,184 messages 280 likes

I absolutely LOVED my MX revolution. Unfortunately it was placed on its charging cradle after being cleaned without properly drying and killed it!

I've since replaced it with the Master 3 - essentially just a newer version of the same mouse. Only two complaints being the M3 is just a hair taller (looks like a tenth of an inch). Isn't much, but just enough to have it scrape the top shelf of my desk whenever I try to slide the keyboard tray in. Plus there's a small but noticeable delay when it wakes from sleep, but I found many wireless mice have that.

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ssjwizard

Has slightly less legible writing than Thideras

5,556 messages 86 likes

I've since replaced it with the Master 3 - essentially just a newer version of the same mouse. Only two complaints being the M3 is just a hair taller (looks like a tenth of an inch). Isn't much, but just enough to have it scrape the top shelf of my desk whenever I try to slide the keyboard tray in. Plus there's a small but noticeable delay when it wakes from sleep, but I found many wireless mice have that.

Just took a look at the Master 3. I dont like the side wheel on that nearly as much as the one on the MX Revolution. It does look like a decent mouse though.

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