MSI Launches SPATIUM M570 HS M.2 PCIe 5.0 NVMe SSD

Yesterday, MSI launched its Spatium M570 HS PCIe 5.0 M.2 NVME SSD. Boasting extreme speeds of up to 10,000 MB/sec sequential read and writes, this latest generation of NVMe sets the bar higher than ever. The Spatium M570 HS is available in 1 Tb and 2 TB models and includes a chunky heatsink to help keep temperatures low and stave off throttling caused by high temperatures. Also included is a data backup and monitoring software by Actify. Pricing was not mentioned in the below press release.

MSI Launches SPATIUM M570 HS M.2 PCIe 5.0 NVMe SSD

CHARGE AHEAD WITH SPEED

MSI Spatium M570 HS M.2 NVMe SSD
MSI Spatium M570 HS M.2 NVMe SSD

MSI, the world’s leading gaming PC hardware brand, is announcing the launch of the next-gen model to its SSD product line – SPATIUM M570 PCIe 5.0 NVMe M.2 HS. With the same gamers’ first attitude that has made MSI products great, MSI continues pushing the limits to unleash next-level storage performance with the latest PCIe Gen 5 controller technology and state-of-the-art 3D NAND flash, providing up to 1.5 times faster read/write speeds compared to the previous generation SSDs. On SPATIUM M570, the aluminium bronze-colored heatsink improves heat dissipation to sustain transfer speeds for professionals, content creators, and gamers to gain valuable milliseconds on latency or to process gigabytes of files. Other performance-improving technologies include DRAM cache buffer and an SLC cache.

MSI Spatium M570 HS M.2 NVMe SSD
MSI Spatium M570 HS M.2 NVMe SSD

MSI Spatium M570 HS M.2 NVMe SSD
MSI Spatium M570 HS M.2 NVMe SSD

The SPATIUM M570 HS is powered by the latest PCIe Gen 5 controller technology with high-quality 3D NAND flash, and advanced cooling takes a sensational leap in storage performance, unleashing the latest in extreme transfer rates of up to 10,000 MB/s sequential read & write speeds for demanding professionals, content creators, and gamers in an easy installation. Sporting a bronze-colored aluminium heatsink, the stacked fin structure efficiently dissipates heat from the M570, and sustains maximum throughput under heavy workloads. With compliance of NVMe 2.0 and M.2 2280 form factor, the SPATIUM M570 HS offers optimal performance and long-lasting durability in 1 TB and 2 TB capacity variants. The SPATIUM M570 HS supports a comprehensive range of data error correction features including LPDC ECC and E2E Data Protection, providing a high-rated TBW (Terabytes Written) for excellent durability and longevity backed with a limited 5-year warranty.

Advanced Software for SSD Status Monitoring & Data Backup Empowered by Actiphy
MSI is providing an advanced software solution with system status monitoring and data backup, built into MSI Center. While using MSI center, the user can see comprehensive information regarding the SSD status including drive health, used capacity, and current operating temperature.

Additionally, MSI has partnered with Actiphy, a world-leading data backup solution, to allow users who purchase and install MSI SSDs into their PC system the ability to create backups.

-John Nester (Blaylock)

About John Nester 399 Articles
John started writing and reviewing PC components for Overclockers.com in 2015, but his passion for PCs dates all the way back to the early 1980s. His first personal computer was a Commodore 64 with a cassette drive. As a dedicated member of the news team, he focuses his articles on new product releases and software updates. He reviews a wide variety of PC components including chassis, storage drives, keyboards, and more. John works in technology as a C.A.D. designer for a major automotive manufacturer. His other passions in life include motorcycles, hunting, guns, and football.

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Avatar of TerranBrackiatt
TerranBrackiatt

Member

325 messages 141 likes

with NVMe's coming with their own large heatsinks, and GPU cards coming with such large heatsinks, it wouldn't surprise me if both motherboards and cases are about to undergo a complete redesign to account for extra size, weight, and locations of these components. i mention motherboards because of the crappy design of placing the M.2 slots underneath the GPU's (even though some models have a slot above the GPU) and also because the GPUs are now sagging due to the lack of natural weight support.

otherwise, i wish i could afford a new system already, but even if i won the Powerball tonight, i'd prolly still wait for the next gen AMD CPU and the the next gen Nvidia GPU (partly because of the dual UHD 240Hz monitor i'm looking at) because i want all the PCIe 5.0 / DDR5 stuff (even though i prolly won't ever need it... lol) After all, Forgotten Legend has all Pcie 4.0 / DDR4 stuff

why am i always broke... /sigh /looks at PC... oh yeah....

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Avatar of Blaylock
Blaylock

"That Backfired" Senior Member

8,025 messages 922 likes

In a sense motherboards already have. The addition of metal PCIe slots to help support the heavier cards and, as you mentioned, the relocation of the M.2 slots. All the flagship motherboards have incorporated heatsinks for the M.2 (at least some of the M.2) and with many of the new PCIe 5 M.2 heatsinks coming with fans I would expect motherboards to start doing the same. Maybe a monoblock-style heatsink with a heat pipe to the chipset, similar to VRM coolers. I'm just spitballing here.

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Avatar of EarthDog
EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner

76,895 messages 3,583 likes

I agree(ish) but I think we've already seen the changes for the most part. Reinforced pcie slots have been around for generations now. And many of these heavier cards include some kind of strut/support as well.

As far as nvme, boards have also been changing for generations now, offering larger heatsinks for the primary nvme socket. People don't like tiny fans (uproar from x570...?) On their boards.. so not sure we'll see a lot of that. Maybe high-end to flagship, but I don't think you see that trickle very far down the product stacks. Next-gen boards will be the telltale sign as drives will finally be out en masse.

Most boards have m.2 sockets above and below the top graphics slot with the primary on top.. been that way for quite a while. You can easily run a SATA-based m.2 or pcie 3.0 drive under a graphics card without throttling. Hell, 4.0
too, but it may throttle with long sessions. Are you running massive transfers while gaming? Something to consider as well. There are not many places to put other sockets... I've seen them next to the ram, but that's an uncommon config too.

We'll be fine. Primary m.2 socket heatsinks will get bigger as the drives run hotter, but the motherboard will still keep the basic config we know today.

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Woomack

Benching Team Leader

13,350 messages 2,447 likes

Almost all motherboards have PCIe 5.0 M.2 sockets above graphics cards or next to RAM (on the PCB directly or add-on cards like ASUS DIMM.2). PCIe 4.0 SSD don't need so large heatsinks and some brands like Gigabyte solved that in a perfect way, with a large flat heatsink that covers multiple sockets and doesn't interfere with large graphics cards.

I would only expect that new SSD will heat up less and deliver similar performance or better than older series. In reality, new SSD are not much faster while they require better cooling. People finally see that sequential bandwidth doesn't mean much in daily work or games and faster random performance is the most important. At least there are many more comments about it around the web than a couple of years ago.
All currently presented or already released M.2 PCIe 5.0 SSD have 10-12GB/s sequential read/write, but about 70MB/s random 1T1Q 4K, so the same or even worse than most non-budget PCIe 4.0 SSD.

Some brands already changed small chipset and M.2 fans to larger and better designed heatsinks. I'm surprised that ASRock is starting to push their new heatsinks with fans as a separate product for many of their motherboards. I already tested it on the B650 PG-ITX and it's a total fail. I can only say 12k RPM fan which runs randomly at max speed. I guess it says all.

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Avatar of EarthDog
EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner

76,895 messages 3,583 likes

I'm surprised that ASRock is starting to push their new heatsinks with fans as a separate product for many of their motherboards.

Im not. They can design their motherboards freely and have a separate product for those who care enough to want to hear a 12k fan scream like a banshee without really doing much. I've got six or seven of those things lying around here for months now collecting dust (after testing one).

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Woomack

Benching Team Leader

13,350 messages 2,447 likes

Im not. They can design their motherboards freely and have a separate product for those who care enough to want to hear a 12k fan scream like a banshee without really doing much. I've got six or seven of those things lying around here for months now collecting dust (after testing one).

One of the main features pushed by marketing nowadays is quiet work. Users don't want these small and noisy fans, most brands modify their motherboards, so the cooling is fully passive ... yet, ASRock back to the design from 10 years ago. This is the thing which surprises me as ASRock used to have new and fresh ideas. As some people said (I don't remember on which website), better would be to install still large, but heatsink with heatpipes like Thermalright is selling. It would look better and would be passive. Then I would say that's a good idea to upgrade an existing motherboard. I can't believe that anyone will buy pretty bad looking ASRock M.2 cooler with 12k RPM fan for a higher series motherboard that looks like Taichi.

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EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner

76,895 messages 3,583 likes

The problem, to me, is that using these heatsinks from the drive, they don't match the motherboard.... and to what end? To not throttle after running over a minute of transfers? The same larger heatsinks we've seen for the fastest M.2 sockets will work about the same, really...

As far as ASRock's device, same... they don't really match their own boards... but most also don't have beefy top heatsinks for the M.2 either... they made themselves a perceived need.

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Avatar of Blaylock
Blaylock

"That Backfired" Senior Member

8,025 messages 922 likes

TBH we don't really know how badly or often the Gen 5 M.2's will be (throttling) until we get some in for review. It seems like they are going to start trickling in soon though.

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Avatar of EarthDog
EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner

76,895 messages 3,583 likes

True, but I'd be floored if these run cooler than the 4.0 drives. I'd gather they aren't making these things and aftermarket solutions bigger because they need less cooling and won't sell, ya know?

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Blaylock

"That Backfired" Senior Member

8,025 messages 922 likes

Oh for sure they'll run hotter. But as far as if they "need" a fan or not, we'll have to see.

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