Posts Tagged: 120 mm

Thermaltake Riing Silent 12 Pro Heatsink Review

Riing Silent 12 Pro

Marking the debut of their 120 mm fan, Thermaltake released the Riing Silent 12 Pro. This cooler has been out for a few years but we’re getting the opportunity to test it here today to see how well it stacks up. Coolers based on a 120 mm design typically need faster fans to improve their cooling capacity which in turn creates more noise. We’ll put this cooler to the test here and see if there’s a trade-off between cooling performance and audible noise and if that “Silent” in Thermaltake Riing Silent 12 Pro is justified. Read More

Silverstone 120 mm PWM Fans Review

Silverstone 120mm fans

We have arrived at the second part of the Silverstone fan review (part 1 was the review of 140 mm Silverstone fans). 120 mm fans can be used as case fans, heatsink fans and radiator fans. These are all PWM fans so they can be used in all three applications. Because they can be used in all three, we test them in the three kinds of situations. If it sounds like a lot of testing, it was. But now we know where these Silverstone fans fit into the 120 mm universe. So let’s get out our telescopes and start looking. Read More

Case Fan Roundup: Twenty Three 120 mm Case Fans Tested

Case fans

Case fans are supposed to cool your case. As use in this review, a case fan is a fixed-voltage fan. Today we might want to call them non-PWM fans. These fans are “set ‘em and forget ‘em” fans. Except that some of you insist on using fan controllers to vary the speeds of your fans. Imagine that! Well, in any case (in any case – get it?) we’re going to look at more than twenty case fans. I say “more than twenty’’ because I can’t count. We have more than 30 fans and settings that we will be looking at today. If you are interested in counting actual fans, be my guest. Read More

be quiet! Pure Rock Review

The company known as be quiet! produces quite a range of products. Today we are looking at a cooler called the Pure Rock. It is a four-heatpipe heatsink, rated at 130 Watts. Now, that’s a lot of cooling for a four—heatpipe heatsink. Will it do that well? With only four heatpipes? Let’s find out. Read More

Scythe Slip Stream 120DB Fan Review

Scythe has unleashed a round dozen of their dual ball bearing Slip Stream 120DB fans on an unsuspecting world. They look just like the old Slip Stream fans of yore, keeping the narrow fan hubs to maximize airflow. Are they worthy successors? Let’s find out. Read More

Deepcool Lucifer K2 Review

Heatsink Installed

Deepcool has been building computer cooling hardware for years. In the last several years they have been pushing into making products for computers. They started with fans. Then they made cases and heatsinks. We are reviewing a new entry, produced under Deepcool’s sub-brand, Gamer Storm. Today: the Lucifer K2. That’s four brand names for this heatsink. That last is a mountain in the Karkorams, second highest in the world. Will it cool as well as its lofty name? Let’s find out. Read More

Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Case Review

Fresh from looking at Nanoxia’s largest case, we will now look at their smallest. The Deep Silence 4 is a four-slot case compact case that is designed to fit a mATX motherboard. Nanoxia clearly took pains to retain their sound deadening design and other valuable features; they worked to keep noise in while sweated to keep the cost out. Did they succeed? Let’s see. Read More

Cooler Master Jetflo Fan Review

Cooler Master has brought to market their “Fourth Generation Bearing,” a bearing based on POM (polyoxymethylene). So far, they have built three fans with POM bearings. The second fan to use a POM bearing is the Jetflo, the very fan we will be reviewing here. The Jetflo has a number of features that make it an interesting fan indeed. In fact, the POM bearing is just the first of its features. So let us review them all, and put the fan through its paces. Read More