Cooling

NZXT Kraken X31 AIO Cooler Review

It seems like everyone is getting into the All-In-One CPU cooler business these days. Even the well-established case- and accessory-maker NZXT has gotten into the act, offering the Kraken line of CPU coolers. The Kraken lineup comes with room for one or two fans, at 120 mm and 140 mm. They always cool well in reviews. But the updated line promise to cool quietly as well. So let’s have a look at the X31, shall we?

Cooling

Cryorig R1 Ultimate Heatsink Review

Cryorig has an “ultimate” heatsink for us: the Cryorig R1 Ultimate. This heatsink is full of advanced technology, and it uses two 140 x 25 mm fans and tandem fin-stack towers. Ultimate, indeed. But does all of this give us the ultimate in cooling experience? Only one way to find out. We will explore the heck out of this heatsink.

Cooling

be quiet! Dark Rock TF Review

The firm known as be quiet! is on a roll. Today we are looking at a unique heatsink, one that has a pair of tandem fin stacks. But the fin stacks are set horizontally while the fan or fans blow downward, washing the motherboard and RAM with air. Wonder if it works? Let’s see!

Cooling

be quiet! Pure Rock Review

The company known as be quiet! produces quite a range of products. Today we are looking at a cooler called the Pure Rock. It is a four-heatpipe heatsink, rated at 130 Watts. Now, that’s a lot of cooling for a four—heatpipe heatsink. Will it do that well? With only four heatpipes? Let’s find out.

Heatsink Installed
Cooling

Deepcool Lucifer K2 Review

Deepcool has been building computer cooling hardware for years. In the last several years they have been pushing into making products for computers. They started with fans. Then they made cases and heatsinks. We are reviewing a new entry, produced under Deepcool’s sub-brand, Gamer Storm. Today: the Lucifer K2. That’s four brand names for this heatsink. That last is a mountain in the Karkorams, second highest in the world. Will it cool as well as its lofty name? Let’s find out.

Cooling

Noctua NH-C14S Review

Not all cases have room for a full tower heatsink. So, Noctua provides a blow-down variety with six heat pipes and a 140 mm fan. That was the NH-C14, and it is quite a cooler. So, what’s new? The NH-C14S (note the change in the model number), with the finstack moved over to make room for cards in the top PCIE slot. How well does this heatsink cool? Let’s find out.

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Cooling

Noctua NH-L12 Heatsink Review

Whether they are for HTPC’s or simply for taking up less room on the desktop, products designed for slim form factor cases are in high demand. CPU heatsinks for cases like this typically blow air down on the motherboard, cooling not only the CPU, but the various components on the motherboard as well. Noctua has responded with five down-blowing CPU heatsinks. This review will focus on the middle model, the Noctua NH-L12. As usual for Noctua heatsinks, it is designed for flexible fan mounting. The fans are controlled by your motherboard through silent PWM circuits.

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Cooling

Thermalright AXP-100 Heatsink Review

Thermalright is one of the top names in PC cooling with a wide array of heatsinks to cool just about any component in a computer. Thermalright has recently released the AXP-100, which is designed for small form factor PCs, such as HTPCs and mini ITX systems. The AXP-100 will be pitted against a direct competitor, the Samuel 17 from Prolimatech, as well as a few larger heatsinks. Will the AXP-100 live up to the Thermalright name?

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Cooling

be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 2 Review

Last time around we took a look at be quiet!’s top-down heatsink, the Shadow Rock TopFlow, which performed well, but had a few clearance issues. The Dark Rock Pro 2 is the next heatsink to go through testing. This heatsink uses the large dual-tower design that has become popular as of late for its performance. So, let’s dig in and see what else be quiet! has to bring to the US market!