Posts Tagged: Scythe

Scythe Big Shuriken 3 Heatsink Review

Scythe remains a household name in the air cooling segment of PC hardware due to their well-received heatsinks and fans over the years. Today, we have Scythe’s Big Shuriken 3 which is a low profile cooler aimed at small form factor (SFF) builds and touts a “zero interference” claim for motherboard and RAM. Let’s see how well it holds up against a test bed full of tower heatsinks and all-in-one liquid coolers. Read More

Scythe Mugen 5 Rev. B Heatsink Review

Scythe’s Mugen 5 Rev. B CPU heatsink sports compatibility with all current CPU sockets from Intel and AMD. The Mugen 5 is a typical single-tower style heatsink with one fin stack, as opposed to their dual tower FUMA heatsink or much larger Ninja 5 heatsink. Read More

Scythe FUMA Rev. B Heatsink Review

Scythe has been around since 2002 manufacturing cooling parts such as heatsinks, fans, and accessories. So, they should be a familiar name to anyone that’s been building PCs in the last decade and a half. Today, we have Scythe’s FUMA Rev. B heatsink, a relatively small dual tower cooler that strives to increase compatibility over the larger, more traditional dual tower offering out there. The major change in this new revision of Scythe’s FUMA heatsink is that it now supports current CPU sockets from both Intel and AMD. Read More

Case Fan Roundup: Twenty Three 120 mm Case Fans Tested

Case fans

Case fans are supposed to cool your case. As use in this review, a case fan is a fixed-voltage fan. Today we might want to call them non-PWM fans. These fans are “set ‘em and forget ‘em” fans. Except that some of you insist on using fan controllers to vary the speeds of your fans. Imagine that! Well, in any case (in any case – get it?) we’re going to look at more than twenty case fans. I say “more than twenty’’ because I can’t count. We have more than 30 fans and settings that we will be looking at today. If you are interested in counting actual fans, be my guest. Read More

PWM Fan Roundup: Twenty-Four 120 mm Case Fans Tested

PWM fans

PWM fans are used for lots of things now. A PWM fan can be used as a case fan, as a heatsink fan, or as a rad fan. AIO coolers simply expand the playing field for PWM fans. So I have collected twenty-four fans here for review in our 2016 case fan roundup. Read More

Coolers for the Intel i7 Broadwell-E

Intel is bringing out its Intel i7 Broadwell-E. What coolers and heatsinks should you use for one of these beasts? The Intel i7 is a Broadwell-E on a 14nm process, with a TDP of 140 watts. The chip will arrive with options for 10, 8 or 6 cores. Joe Shields (earthdog) has done a review of one of the Broadwell-E chips and associated motherboard. This summary will review some of the coolers you should consider for your new chip. Read More

Scythe Fuma Heatsink Review

Scythe has released its entry into the world of tandem tower heatsinks: the Fuma. Scythe heatsinks all have Japanese names, and the Fuma is no exception: it means “wind demon” in Japanese. It is powered by two Slip Stream 120 PWM fans. Sounds promising, but unlike the seemingly unending series of 160+ mm towers, the Fuma is less than 150 mm tall. Is this heatsink a wind demon or a mere dust devil? Let’s find out! Read More

Scythe Slip Stream 120DB Fan Review

Scythe has unleashed a round dozen of their dual ball bearing Slip Stream 120DB fans on an unsuspecting world. They look just like the old Slip Stream fans of yore, keeping the narrow fan hubs to maximize airflow. Are they worthy successors? Let’s find out. Read More

Scythe Ninja 4 Heatsink Review

The Ninja heatsinks are beautiful, symmetrical heatsinks. The Ninja 4 is all that; you would love to have this heatsink decorating your computer from its looks alone. But will it cool? Is it easy to mount? Let’s see. Read More

Scythe Kama Panel 3.1 Review

Scythe has really been pumping out the new products. At the time of this writing, they were up to eighteen products for the year. Today we are looking at the Kama Panel 3.1. This is a clever 5.25-inch front panel that allows you to move your controls from the top of a case to the front. And it expands your computer’s versatility while it does so. Read More