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Dead NAS

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WhitehawkEQ

Premium Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2010
My NAS died, but I know what the problem is and how to fix it :) I have 2 bulging caps on the PSU so it might be a good idea to replace all the caps at this time :)

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Holy cow. How old is your NAS? I haven't seen this issue on any gear in the last 10 years?

So a cheap and easy fix. Gotta love that.
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Looking closer at your pictures, your NAS is very clean. Where's the dust buddy?
 
Holy cow. How old is your NAS? I haven't seen this issue on any gear in the last 10 years?

So a cheap and easy fix. Gotta love that.
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Looking closer at your pictures, your NAS is very clean. Where's the dust buddy?
It's over 12 years old, I think I got it in 08 or 07, as for dust? I blew that out already but there was not much to begin with.
 
It's been a long time but I got the bad caps replaced, but still don't work. I think it's a blown fuse, soon as I get that replaced I'll post again.
 
I have a bad experience with NAS devices in general. We have been selling them at work for many years. It's mainly QNAP, but also some other brands like WD. I also reviewed some of them, like the TerraMaster brand and some more. I guess I had no problems, only with rack Synology.
There are so many problems with most of them. I don't know how a NAS designed for 24/7 work can freeze, simply break, have problems during more demanding operations (still designed for that device), crash after updates, limit access to the stored data, or have problems with LAN performance ... the list is much longer ... Some of my clients literally bought 2 different NAS so they have a copy of the copy.
It's basically a low-power PC closed in a small box (or a slim rack enclosure), but clearly, there are many design flaws that barely ever happen on a regular PC with free software like Free NAS or something similar. This is probably to cut costs, but the end-user prices are getting ridiculous for what we get. Once you put any overpriced NAS into pieces, you wonder what may cost so much.

It's kind of off-topic, but we recently had a conversation about it at work, and it's what more people in my environment think about it.
Fixing a broken device seems a good idea (especially when it's cheap) and good luck with that, but I just wouldn't trust it if I was using it for some more important data.
 
Got my NAS up and running, found a used NAS same model and swapped PSU's. Now backing up everything on it and going to get a new NAS.
 
Can someone tell me how a Win 10 22H2 PC can not access a 20 year old NAS, and a Win 10 1603 PC CAN!?

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I found that newer versions of Windows seem to take longer to discover other local devices on the network. It'll get there, might just take a while.
 
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