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External Matrix Raid

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rainless

Old Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2006
Hey all! Long time no see!

Anyway, I've got two drives in a RAID 0+1 configuration... and like a lot of people nowadays I no longer have a desktop PC.

So I was thinking about getting an external RAID box to run my drives like this one: http://www.amazon.com/ORICO-9528RU3...&qid=1454261260&sr=8-4&keywords=external+raid

...but I'm wondering if there even exists an external unit that could run a 0+1 setup? (Initially I setup the drives on an Asus P5Q Pro.)

As an added bonus I'm on a mac now.

Any ideas?

Also I found this one: http://www.amazon.de/Icy-Box-IB-RD3...8&qid=1454261393&sr=8-1&keywords=externe+raid
 

Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
0+1 like "RAID10" or RAID 0 and 1 ? For RAID 10 you need at least 4 drives but most new 4 bay NAS will support it including mentioned QNAP. RAID 0 and RAID 1 are supported on all 2 bay NAS.

QNAP is one of the best options on the market but you can probably find something cheaper like Synology. Just check real bandwidth of NAS. New faster units have Atom or Celeron CPUs and 4GB RAM+ support. Slower units are on ARM CPUs ( Cortex etc ). Forget about Marvell CPUs or anything slower if you care about at least 50MB/s bandwidth.
Faster units are better for larger RAID just because they can handle random transfers better. If you think about RAID 5 then I recommend better specification as it's performing a lot of additional operations. For RAID 0 and RAID 1 something slower will be enough as it is still capable to run at 100MB/s ( if manufacturer declares it ).
 
OP
rainless

rainless

Old Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2006
0+1 like "RAID10" or RAID 0 and 1 ? For RAID 10 you need at least 4 drives but most new 4 bay NAS will support it including mentioned QNAP. RAID 0 and RAID 1 are supported on all 2 bay NAS.

QNAP is one of the best options on the market but you can probably find something cheaper like Synology. Just check real bandwidth of NAS. New faster units have Atom or Celeron CPUs and 4GB RAM+ support. Slower units are on ARM CPUs ( Cortex etc ). Forget about Marvell CPUs or anything slower if you care about at least 50MB/s bandwidth.
Faster units are better for larger RAID just because they can handle random transfers better. If you think about RAID 5 then I recommend better specification as it's performing a lot of additional operations. For RAID 0 and RAID 1 something slower will be enough as it is still capable to run at 100MB/s ( if manufacturer declares it ).

Well I mean, precisely "RAID 0+1"... as in the "Intel Matrix RAID" where you have half the drive (or in my case 20% of the drive) partitioned as RAID 0 and the other half (or in my case 80%) partitioned as RAID 1. So you've got two drives where 20% of them are RAID 0 and 80% RAID 1.

I'll look into this QNAP thing and see if it can do it.
 

HankB

Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Location
Beautiful Sunny Winfield
Still looking for info. Anybody?
How much work are you willing to put into it? I've used Linux RAID (md-raid) for years now - probably close to a decade. My 'NAS' is a j1900 motherboard that boots from a laptop drive (because I had one handy) and has two 3TB spinning drives in RAID1. If I chose to, I could partition them differently so that a portion could be RAID0 and another could be RAID1. I'm running Debian server on it. A side benefit is that I can run other stuff on it like like a mosquitto server and three threads of Rosetta. Altogether it uses 35 watts according to my Kill A Watt. (and that's while crunching.) I use 'rsync' to back up to it and have a similar box at my son's place for remote backups. To reach that I use rsync over an ssh tunnel. Oh, yeah, there's also a DLNA server for serving my videos and it also exports my music collection to a Raspberry Pi audio player.

I don't know enough about the ready-made NAS devices but I suspect they run Linux under the hood and have a custom web interface for management. I manage mine using the command line and since Linux is not 'under the hood' I can do whatever else I want with it. That's less useful for someone not conversant with Linux. There may be fancy GUIs for managing a Linux based NAS but I have never looked for one so I cannot say for sure.

I do have a partition set up for a Time Machine backup for an old MAC laptop (running Yosemite.) I've never restored a file so I can't comment on how well that works.
 
OP
rainless

rainless

Old Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2006
How much work are you willing to put into it? I've used Linux RAID (md-raid) for years now - probably close to a decade. My 'NAS' is a j1900 motherboard that boots from a laptop drive (because I had one handy) and has two 3TB spinning drives in RAID1. If I chose to, I could partition them differently so that a portion could be RAID0 and another could be RAID1. I'm running Debian server on it. A side benefit is that I can run other stuff on it like like a mosquitto server and three threads of Rosetta. Altogether it uses 35 watts according to my Kill A Watt. (and that's while crunching.) I use 'rsync' to back up to it and have a similar box at my son's place for remote backups. To reach that I use rsync over an ssh tunnel. Oh, yeah, there's also a DLNA server for serving my videos and it also exports my music collection to a Raspberry Pi audio player.

I don't know enough about the ready-made NAS devices but I suspect they run Linux under the hood and have a custom web interface for management. I manage mine using the command line and since Linux is not 'under the hood' I can do whatever else I want with it. That's less useful for someone not conversant with Linux. There may be fancy GUIs for managing a Linux based NAS but I have never looked for one so I cannot say for sure.

I do have a partition set up for a Time Machine backup for an old MAC laptop (running Yosemite.) I've never restored a file so I can't comment on how well that works.

This "software RAID" (it's built into the bios... I mean I suppose technically all ICH9 boards could run raid if you put a RAID bios into them), is a weird thing. I've heard that it will only work with the same kind of software RAID, so switching from one to another (supposedly) isn't going to work.

It used to be there were like fifty people on this board that used Intel Matrix RAID and could've answered this question in about 3 minutes... but I guess things have slowed down a bit.

I'm not even sure where to go to ask about this now... Maybe an intel forum or something?

I've got data on these two old drives that I *desperately* need off. (They're episodes of my old TV show...)
 

HankB

Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Location
Beautiful Sunny Winfield
I misunderstood your original question. I thought you were trying to set up a new RAID and it seems like you're trying to recover data from an old one.

I did some googling relative to Linux and didn't find anything encouraging. I didn't see anything that indicated that there was any Linux support for this kind of RAID aside from supporting it on the original controller. You might try googling for data recovery in case something does exist on some platform.

At worst it looks like you would have to buy (or beg, borrow or steal) a board with a compatible RAID controller. You probably already knew that so I'm afraid I'm not much help. Searching " data recovery intel raid" comes up with some promising looking options.