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Massive Overheating Issues (overclocked FX-8320)

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A Wandererfa

New Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2020
Hello there!

◧ I've had my processor overclocked 3,5 years ago when I purchased it along with an entirely new system. I don't think the guy did a very good job, I have been having overheating issues from the get-go (+- 35°C during idle, pushing 70°C on +70% CPU usage during autumn/winter, jumping up 15-20°C every time I click on a YT clip or open the GOP player) and I've been adjusting my cooling system accordingly. Unfortunately, during the warmer periods of the year, I need to be extra careful since crashes due to overheating are very likely, even on 35% CPU usage.

◧ Today, after experiencing consecutive crashes due to overheating, I realized that I need to make some changes or something will be destroyed (motherboard, HDDs, etc.). I've been having trouble browsing through the internet, listening to music, and doing some other work (maxing at 20% CPU usage) because the PC keeps crashing down. Given the fact that I don't know this subject at all, I am unsure as to what I should do (readjust my overlock, revert back to stock settings, underclocking) or how I should go about it (BIOS or MSI Control Center), I am asking for some help. Thank you in advance!


Technical Characteristics
Motherboard: MSI 990XA-GD55 (Military Class II)
WaterCooler: Corsair Hydro 105 (with Corsair SP120 fans)
Power supply: Corsair CX750 (80-Bronze Plus)

CPUID.jpg MSI Control Center.jpg CPU-Z .jpg
 
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Kenrou

Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2014
:welcome:

Have you checked if the cooler pump/fans are working properly ? At a glance CPUID shows 1.48v max spiking on vcore and that seems to be on the very high side for your particular AIO — Your HT link seems to be running at an odd speed and your memory is very much under the speed it's supposed to run at — Your CPU does not show on your motherboard compatibility list, but the previous gen does so it's a bit hit/miss if it will work properly.

I would say reset BIOS to default/optimized options then go from there ? Check the links below, they helped me a lot when I got my old FX-8370 and keep posting when in doubt :)

https://www.overclockers.com/forums...ormance-Scaling-Charts-max-OCs)LN2-Results-co — OC guide for your CPU

https://www.overclockers.com/forums...Testing-for-Beginners-Which-tool-should-I-use — stress testing programs, what to use to check if you're stable
 
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OP
A

A Wandererfa

New Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2020
:welcome:

Have you checked if the cooler pump/fans are working properly ? At a glance CPUID shows 1.48v max spiking on vcore and that seems to be on the very high side for your particular AIO — Your HT link seems to be running at an odd speed and your memory is very much under the speed it's supposed to run at — Your CPU does not show on your motherboard compatibility list, but the previous gen does so it's a bit hit/miss if it will work properly.

I would say reset BIOS to default/optimized options then go from there ? Check the links below, they helped me a lot when I got my old FX-8370 and keep posting when in doubt :)

https://www.overclockers.com/forums...ormance-Scaling-Charts-max-OCs)LN2-Results-co — OC guide for your CPU

https://www.overclockers.com/forums...Testing-for-Beginners-Which-tool-should-I-use — stress testing programs, what to use to check if you're stable



I appreciate the welcome :)

How do I check whether or not the cooler pump/fans are working properly? Does this require a manual or digital checkup? If it is the former, I don't have much of an idea of what a properly working cooler pump and/or fans look like. Regarding the RAM speed, I don't have much of a comment - apparently "the guy" did not do a good job on this either. After a quick glance, I don't think those guides will help me out since I do not understand most of what it's written in them. So, your suggestion is reset through BIOS. Let me think about it.
 
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OP
A

A Wandererfa

New Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2020
I see that you posted CorsairCX. Because it's a CX, your PSU is more likely to have bad caps.

https://www.badcaps.net/index.php?pageid=identity

One of the reported symptoms:

Thanks for replying. Are you suggesting that I should inspect my PSU in order to see whether or not its capacitors may be faulty? If that's your suggestion, I have to state that none of its capacitors are visible. I will have to take it apart and I am not in the position to do so, unfortunately.
 

RJARRRPCGP

Member
Joined
May 30, 2004
Thanks for replying. Are you suggesting that I should inspect my PSU in order to see whether or not its capacitors may be faulty? If that's your suggestion, I have to state that none of its capacitors are visible. I will have to take it apart and I am not in the position to do so, unfortunately.

They apparently cheaped out with the CX series. I would at least get a TX series!
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
The Corsair Hydro 105 has now been in service for 3.5 years according to your first post. It is possible that the radiator and or the water block is gunked up with algae by now. Being a closed loop system there is no good way to flush the system. With custom-built open loops you flush them about yearly to prevent this. So it might be time for a new cooler. You don't have to go with water as top end air is about as good with regard to cooling power.

I think the first thing I would try is removing the water block, cleaning the two surfaces (bottom of water block and top of CPU) with isopropyl alcohol, reapply thermal paste and reseat the water block. It may be the water block was never seated properly and is not making good contact with the top of the CPU.

Can you elaborate on this statement: "I will have to take it apart and I am not in the position to do so, unfortunately." If you don't mind me asking, is this reflective of your experience/knowledge level or some physical limitation?
 
OP
A

A Wandererfa

New Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2020
The Corsair Hydro 105 has now been in service for 3.5 years according to your first post. It is possible that the radiator and or the water block is gunked up with algae by now. Being a closed loop system there is no good way to flush the system. With custom-built open loops you flush them about yearly to prevent this. So it might be time for a new cooler. You don't have to go with water as top end air is about as good with regard to cooling power.

I think the first thing I would try is removing the water block, cleaning the two surfaces (bottom of water block and top of CPU) with isopropyl alcohol, reapply thermal paste and reseat the water block. It may be the water block was never seated properly and is not making good contact with the top of the CPU.

Can you elaborate on this statement: "I will have to take it apart and I am not in the position to do so, unfortunately." If you don't mind me asking, is this reflective of your experience/knowledge level or some physical limitation?

Thank you for the very interesting reply!

As I've reiterated, I've always had, from the very beginning, overheating issues with my PC. Even during wintertime, I was never able to run it below 40°C, even with 15-20% CPU usage, while I've been consistently hovering around the mid-60s with 60% CPU usage. I should note that I maintain fan speeds of 45-60% during the periods of autumn/winter and 65-85% during the periods of spring/summer. Once in a while during the warmer days of the year, my PC tends to start overheating immensely for a day or two, completely out of the blue, and, then, it "magically" reverts back to its "normal" state. I think that today's issues are instances of this phenomenon. Nonetheless, even I am incorrect, I do not have much experience/knowledge to confidently take it apart in order to perform the maintenance procedures that you have suggested. I originally posted soliciting "underclocking" instructions just in case the issue could be resolved without further intervention. If this process were to fail, I would then opt for professional assistance.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Knowledge/experience can only be had by getting your hands dirty. We all had to start somewhere at sometime adding one skill to another until we had a good grasp of the whole picture. Comfort levels come with doing. We are here to help you but we can't do that if you aren't willing to help yourself. You indicate the person who built your system likely didn't do something correctly but this is what happens when you depend on others to do things for you.

What I was suggesting about checking the water block contact is actually very simple and requires no special tools. But you dismissed it right away.
 

Kenrou

Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2014
If Trents is right about the cooler being clogged the only safe way forward is a new one like he said. Underclocking is always a possibility (shouldn't need more than 1.3v for stock speed, which will bring temperature and performance right down) but it's like putting a band aid on a gushing wound, it's a temporary measure and it will become worse over time.

One thing to consider, since the spikes only happen sporadically, could it be some piece of software running in the background ? Anti-virus, motherboard/fan controller, maybe even a piece of mining malware ? What is your usual CPU usage at idle ?