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BitTorrent Client Uses

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Lummoxx

Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2001
Location
Troy, NY
BT is effective for any file, or files that a number of people have, that are generally too large for a single server to feed to numerous downloaders.

All this talk of what do people download with BT, especially with the undercurrent being "if not for illegal applications, then what", is disingenuous at best, and troll-ish at worst. There are numerous, and often recited legal and useful .torrents.

The bottom line is, it is simply another technology. If you have need of this technology, then use it. If you don't need it, simply don't use it. Use it illegally, and you run the risk of being prosecuted.

IIRC, the "most popular and efficient p2p networks" that you refer to were not much more than .torrent repositories for copyrighted material that shouldn't be downloaded anyway. Otherwise, they could have remained in business simply by removing the .torrents in question. It appears that this equated to roughly all of them, resulting in the out of business part.

Finally, to refer to articles found by your link, all he agreed to do was remove links to copyrighted material from his web site. Hardly a condemnation of BT as a technology and tool.
 
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ZhengHe

ZhengHe

Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2004
Lummoxx said:
BT is effective for any file, or files that a number of people have, that are generally too large for a single server to feed to numerous downloaders.

All this talk of what do people download with BT, especially with the undercurrent being "if not for illegal applications, then what", is disingenuous at best, and troll-ish at worst. There are numerous, and often recited legal and useful .torrents.

The bottom line is, it is simply another technology. If you have need of this technology, then use it. If you don't need it, simply don't use it. Use it illegally, and you run the risk of being prosecuted.

IIRC, the "most popular and efficient p2p networks" that you refer to were not much more than .torrent repositories for copyrighted material that shouldn't be downloaded anyway. Otherwise, they could have remained in business simply by removing the .torrents in question. It appears that this equated to roughly all of them, resulting in the out of business part.

Finally, to refer to articles found by your link, all he agreed to do was remove links to copyrighted material from his web site. Hardly a condemnation of BT as a technology and tool.

I apologize if you were insulted by my introduction. I myself am naïve to the topic of Bittorent and didn’t mean to misinform or be a hypocrite of sorts, as you seem to suggest, but just inquire and if I came across as brash and arrogant then I apologize further, because that was not my intention. Having been thus rectified I will remove my link and accompaniment so that other people might not be misled.

Having said that you still haven’t answered my question at least on a more personal level as to what do you use your p2p client(s) for as far as your delay routine and not the mass of humanity.
 
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