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Homemade PSU help

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Overload

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
I am trying to build a PSU. I have it all put together but when i plug it it i get a large current spike on the 120v primary side of my transformer. i have removed all components exept the two rectifiers (their soldered in) and it still occurs. i lost my schematic and board design (due to format and reinstall) but here is a crude paint sketch of the way my board looks:
PSUboard

Can anyone tell me what i have done wrong?
 
Last edited:
OP
Overload

Overload

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
additional note:

with the transformer by itself there is the slightest little twitch on my ammeter, but when its plugged into my board it spikes well over 6 amps
 

Yarr

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Apr 16, 2003
Location
Netherlands
ever tried powering it up with one of the 20 Vac disconected?
Although I think it shouldn't be a problem in this case but I still get shivers down my spine when connecting a + to a -

Might be prudent to check if your rectifiers are still working correctly.
 
OP
Overload

Overload

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
yea i tried puting just 20v on each rectifier. it still did the same thing on each rectifier.

i know what you mean about connecting a + to a - but Theoretically it should not be a problem. i even have a 12v supply (i didnt make it) with two separate 12v outputs. i just connected the + and - from each out put to give me +- 12v. it works fine edit: it does use discrete diodes instead of a rectifier if that makes any difference

i suspected i may have burt it up soldering it to the board. i used a diode checker and campared it with one that has never been touched and they checked the same. anyone know the proper way to check a rectifier?
 

AMD Phreak

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Apr 2, 2003
Location
255.255.255.255
You could try an o-scope and check for a sinusoidal waveform. That would me my first try. At least that is how we did it in labs at school.
 

larrymoencurly

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2002
Is it really OK to have those two AC inputs tied together if the plus and minus outputs share the same ground?

I thought that if the transformer had only one secondary, the only way to get + and - voltages was with a center tap, and only one bridge would be needed.
 
OP
Overload

Overload

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
My transformer is center taped with 20v on each side. and it can be done with 1 or 2 rectifiers. if you use just one and use the center tap as DC ground you get a plus and minus rail. if you dont use the center tap you get twice as much DC voltage but only + or -. using two rectifiers like i am trying to do gives a cleaner supply and allows higher current capacity, that is if you do it right:p

I wish i had an o-scope, but thay are expensive. however, any suggestions where i might get a good deal on one?
 

pik4chu

Senior Yellow Forum Rat
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Jan 17, 2003
Location
Centennial, Colorado
Overload said:
.....
I wish i had an o-scope, but thay are expensive. however, any suggestions where i might get a good deal on one?

Cheapest Ive seen are on eBay..but still over a few hundreds bucks. But you could get lucky I guess.
 
OP
Overload

Overload

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
here is one of the referances i used. its about in the middle of the page, the top one from TR1

psu
 

larrymoencurly

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2002
pby5cat, doesn't that schematic have the bridge rectifiers connected slightly differently, in parallel (for greater current capacity?) instead of stacked?

What happens when you try your PSU with only one bridge installed at a time?
 

bigben2k

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Joined
Jun 17, 2002
Location
Texas
Your power spike could be from the caps that charge up, when you turn it all on. Otherwise, it's from the coils of the transformer.

You can compensate for the former, but not the latter. You might want to take a look at an actual PSU schematic, or do what I did, and strip one apart ;)
 
OP
Overload

Overload

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
How do i compensate for it.

i am starting to suspect the type of transformer i am using. in the link i posted( and others i have looked at as well), the transformer used two separate windings for each rectifier. mine is a single winding with a center tap. other circuits i have looked at using a single rectifier use this type of transformer. so maybe you can only connect two rectifies in series if the windings at serparate. but i havent been able to figure out why this would be. can anyone explain it?
 

bigben2k

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Jun 17, 2002
Location
Texas
To confirm that that's indeed the problem, try the circuit without the big caps (1500 uF): that should definitely identify the problem.

How did you size those caps?

What's the max amperage output of the transformer?
 

Since87

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Jul 30, 2002
Location
Indiana
Overload said:
so maybe you can only connect two rectifies in series if the windings at serparate. but i havent been able to figure out why this would be. can anyone explain it?

During half the AC cycle, the diodes in the bridge rectifiers are shorting out the transformer secondary.

short.gif


Note the current path shown in red. This applies during one half of the AC cycle.

To use that transformer you need to tie the center tap of the transformer to DC ground, and half wave rectify each polarity.
 

star882

Disabled
Joined
Jan 6, 2003
"To use that transformer you need to tie the center tap of the transformer to DC ground, and half wave rectify each polarity."
You can have a design where you have two half-wave rectifiers for each output, one works on one half cycle, and the other works on the other half cycle.
In other words, you get a full-wave rectifier.
 
OP
Overload

Overload

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
ahh, of course. my mistake is very clear now ( dont know why i didnt notice that before). thanks for all of the help everyone. time to start over and do it right this time!
 

Since87

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2002
Location
Indiana
star882 said:
"To use that transformer you need to tie the center tap of the transformer to DC ground, and half wave rectify each polarity."
You can have a design where you have two half-wave rectifiers for each output, one works on one half cycle, and the other works on the other half cycle.
In other words, you get a full-wave rectifier.

Yes, I didn't explain that very clearly.

In other words, use the connection scheme shown for TR2 in Figure 2 here.