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Questions about running ethernet through new house?

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OGMCVilleTC

Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2008
Location
Tn
I dont know if this is in the right area or not. I am looking to run cat6 through my house. I have been reading on the internet and have seemed to got even more confused than before. I plan on running the cables under the house and into the walls to jacks. I plan on having multiple jacks in each room. Should I use stranded or unstranded? I heard cat6 isnt really any different than cat5e. Should I use shielded or unshielded? I basically have no idea what I'm going to need to actually do the install besides the cable.

I plan on using this switch NETGEAR GS724T-300NAS. Also if I run my internet straight into the switch will it allow me to have internet throughout my whole house? Do I need to run internet to the router and then to the switch in order to get internet in all my rooms? I have called a few places here in town and have been told a couple different things. I am starting to pull out what little hair I have left. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Oh and I plan on doing this so I can stream media through my whole home from my computer and also have hard wired internet for all my gaming consoles. Thanks again.


P.S. House isnt a new construction house its just new to me as I am moving into it from my apartment.
 
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TempliNocturnus

Member
Joined
May 19, 2006
Location
Where angels carry savage weapons
Both cat5e and cat6 are rated for 1Gbps speeds, however I've had better experiences getting a GB link with cat6. Therefore I would recommend using cat6 over cat5e, unless you're on a really tight budget (it's not that much more). If you use cat6, make sure your RJ45 connectors, patch panels, and wall jacks are also rated for cat6; otherwise you'll likely get the equal or worse performance than cat5e and the connections will break easily.

Stranded cable cost more and is a bit more resilient to bending and flexing. Your cable is going to be in the wall and shouldn't move around at all, so I'd suggest going with un-stranded.

You will have to use a router. Basically, the typical setup would have a patch panel with wires terminated to it from your walls, you'd have patch cables connected to each port on a switch, then you would have a router plugged into one of the switchports. The router then goes to your modem and then your ISP.
 

SpeeDj

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2000
Location
Milwaukee, WI
I would recommend going with Solid wire if you are running it in wall through the house it will hold up better over time keep that in mind when you are shopping for keystone jacks as some are designed for solid wire, and others for stranded. I use CAT5E and honestly still seem to get the full throughput on my span but that's just my experience. If you go with CAT6 you will future proof the wiring a bit longer.

http://www.monoprice.com/products/department.asp?c_id=105 highly recommended, they will be your source for all you will need to wire up the house right

Here's a link to CAT6 Bulk Cable you would then use Keystone Jacks to tidy up the install along with Keystone Plates that the keystones snap into. One tool that you might want to look at picking up is called a Versabit (it's what cable installers use to drill down into the floorboard between the walls) I used a Greenlee version when I did my house, you can find them at Lowes.com they call it a (Greenlee 4-Piece Quick Change Extension Kit) it has the auger bit and the flexshaft 4ish feet worth. I would also recommend a Greenlee Keyhole Saw

Together that should be enough to get your started, I highly recommend doing it up right you'll enjoy it more in the long run.

J :cool:
 

RollingThunder

Destroyer of Trolls & Spammers
Joined
Jan 7, 2005
OGM,

Agree with the other posts. My son had a new home built this year and he had the electrcian wire the house for ethernet. They discussed solid and stranded CAT6 cable and stranded was decided upon. However on a new build the conditions for doing this are quite different and very easy. I am assuming most of us won't know the difference between solid and stranded CAT6 when doing an older home.

RT
 
OP
OGMCVilleTC

OGMCVilleTC

Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2008
Location
Tn
Ok just ordered the cable, keystone jacks, and wall plates. What is the versabit for? Also do you have any recommendations on a switch? I was looking into the netgear gigabit one listed above but not sure if that is really necessary. I want the fastest speeds possible but also want the best value on a quality product. Any suggestions on the switch?

Also thanks for all the input. I really appreciate it.

These are the two switches I am currently looking at.

D'Link

Netgear
 

TempliNocturnus

Member
Joined
May 19, 2006
Location
Where angels carry savage weapons
Depends on your needs. For typical home applications with simple PCs on the edge, that unmanaged D-link device would suffice and save you money. A managed switch (the Netgear) would allow you to logically segment your network (VLANs) and allow optimal use of other edge devices besides than computers (certain IP phones are the only thing I can think of off the top of my head).

Unless you're a business, you probably do not needed the added security VLANs can provide and you're probably only going to use standard desktop/laptop computers. If you get a managed switch, you're likely not going to use any of the additional features you paid for. The only way I would recommend a managed switch for home use is if you would like to learn more about networking and/or you believe you will employ those additional features later on.
 

SteveLord

Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2005
Wow, don't waste money on those. Get a Trendnet switch. Cheap and reliable.

16 port

8 port

5 port

Me personally, I don't think it's worth the time and money to do this to most existing homes nowadays. I stream using my XOOM/SplashTop app just fine. And that's only 802.11g.
 
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OGMCVilleTC

OGMCVilleTC

Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2008
Location
Tn
Wow, don't waste money on those. Get a Trendnet switch. Cheap and reliable.

16 port

8 port

5 port

Me personally, I don't think it's worth the time and money to do this to most existing homes nowadays. I stream using my XOOM/SplashTop app just fine. And that's only 802.11g.

Wireless isn't reliable enough to stream the media I want to the devices I have. I get a lot of stuttering.

I don't plan on setting up a vpn or anything of that sort. Don't really see what the benefit of setting it up is. Only devices that are going to be on my network are a couple pcs, xboxs, ps3s, and some other media streaming devices like the iomega. So you think the dlink would do just fine? I'm also going to look into a cable tester now. Anything special I need? And again thanks for all the responses you all are a super huge help.
 

SpeeDj

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2000
Location
Milwaukee, WI
What is the versabit for?
It's it a auger style drill bit with a flexible extension typically around 4 to 5 ft in length you drill into the drywall at the level you want the jack and almost parallel to the wall what it does is drills through your floor between your two walls so that you can run the cable through the floor into your basement. I did this in our office and ran a span to our living room hanging the cable through the joists as I went. It's hard to describe but hopefully that gives you a good mental picture to go with. Cable installers use these exclusively when they come out to your house to run your cable line for your cable service. I had them install a cable jack in the office and saw just how easy the versabit made life and got one for when I ran the cabling for our ethernet hard line. Next thing I want to do is put jacks in more rooms of the house and use my 10 port cisco switch to interconnect it all.

Hope this helps a little

J :cool:

p.s. I like the netgear as well it's a managed switch which is nice if you are planning to actually use that function, if not I'd go with the dLink.
 
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TiZakit

Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Location
Doylestown, Ohio
Wireless isn't reliable enough to stream the media I want to the devices I have. I get a lot of stuttering.

I don't plan on setting up a vpn or anything of that sort. Don't really see what the benefit of setting it up is. Only devices that are going to be on my network are a couple pcs, xboxs, ps3s, and some other media streaming devices like the iomega. So you think the dlink would do just fine? I'm also going to look into a cable tester now. Anything special I need? And again thanks for all the responses you all are a super huge help.


Last post was suggesting you spend less money and get a trendnet switch. Which is also unmanaged like the D-link one you posted, but costs less. It has 16 ports instead of 24 though.

As for cable tester, I guess it depends on how often you plan to use it afterwards, or what your budget is.

I've got the Klein LanScout Jr. It's a good mid range tool.

You could get away with something cheaper though. Something like this:
RJ-11 and RJ-45 Modular Plug Tester

One of these wire strippers will save you a ton of time:
Wire Stripper

Some other considerations:

You can wire from your keystone jacks to a patch panel (also available at monoprice and come with a cheap punchdown tool) or just crimp some RJ-45s on to the end of your cables and run it directly into the switch. So you are either going to need RJ-45 connectors and a crimper, or a ton of patch cables. (Or roll your own with a crimper)

MOD Crimper

CAT6 MOD Connector

I second the need for the versa bit. Just think about what you are actually going to be doing. It might help to do down to the local home improvement store and see one. They are typically in the electical department, not near the tools.

Actually, here is a demo on the bit. Not a very good demo, he is missing the placement tool.
DVersi6.jpg

You'll need some fish tape too. I've always found fish tape very over priced, and got a used greenlee one from ebay for cheap.
 
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Adragontattoo

Trailer Chasing Senior
Few things to add here.

New House (assuming being built):

If you are running the cable to save $$. Work with the GC, electrician, and drywall guys to coordinate, you dont and you WILL regret it.

Run at LEAST 2 drops more then you think to each room. i.e. you WILL need a drop in a location that is just |______________________| that far out of reach. Take measurements and document where you ran the cable to, coil up and attach to a stud out of the way of the electricians, and drywall guys.

Run Cat5/5e for phone, it works and it is easy to convert to phone or net drop.

Run Cat6 for network, its new construction, and trying to rerun cable after the drywall goes up is a nightmare.

Run rg59 and rg6 to each room labeling them appropriately. rg59 is for satellite, rg6 is for cable tv/IR emitters.

Run at least 1 extra pull line with each run, that way you can add in cables easier at a later time.

Run Speaker wire if you even think you might want a home theater at some point.

Look at getting a cable pass through for your TV(s) if you are going to wall mount them, you can get them with intergrated power as well.

Try to not have ANY harsh bends, the straighter the run, the easier to run additional later.

Keep at least 1' between AC and your low voltage cables.

Look into running a cable duct/tray from the basement to the attic at the least. Run all your planned low voltage through the duct/tray (overkill moment: tray 1 for phone, tray 2 Rg59, tray 3 for RG6, tray 4 for network, tray 5 for internet, etc)... The biggest duct/tray you can run, will quickly be full if you try to cram in everything.

Document EVERY SINGLE RUN! Photos, measure, pictures, drawings. The drywall guys will probably cover up a few cables, your documentation will result in less holes to locate the cable.

WORK WITH THE GC, ELECTRICIANS AND DRYWALL GUYS. You may be paying them, but they can conveniently "forget" to cut holes, mount low voltage boxes or whatever they want. Your electrician can "accidently" pull out all your cabling. Check your local code, typically low voltage (Cat5/5e/6/coax) have no or minimal inspection requirements.

Run everything to a central location, whether the basement or attic, or whatever. Work from a single spot out. You can then put in a small telco rack, or a wall mount for patch panels or whatever.

Use different colors for Cat5/5e/6, but standardize. Blue is for Cat5, for phones, Red is for Cat6 for Internet, Pink is for Cat5e for security system.

Raid the heck out of http://Monoprice.com you will pay 1/2 the cost or less and wont regret it.

Even if you run XX number of drops and only have a 4 port switch, you will have the ability to upgrade later without the additional nightmare of trying to run cables.

Figure out what you want to do, before you have drywall up. add 50% to your estimate and then you are probably close to correct.
 
OP
OGMCVilleTC

OGMCVilleTC

Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2008
Location
Tn
SpeeDJ and Tizakit thanks for the clarification. I ordered these to connect to the end of the cable to put into the back of the switch RJ45 punchdown jacks. Would it be better to actually have them mounted into a panel and just connect the switch with patch cables? Also I read that the solid cable isn't as good for patch so I just planned on buying some from monoprice. Unless this isn't true.

Adragontattoo thanks for your input also. It isn't a new build just a new home for me and the misses. Sorry I thought I had stated that.

Also tizakit I reckon I would just use the tester on each end of the cable and it would tell me if they are correctly wired after the ends are on, correct?
 

TiZakit

Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Location
Doylestown, Ohio
What you had listed there is a female end. You need the male end to connect into a switch.
http://www.monoprice.com/products/p...=10513&cs_id=1051305&p_id=7266&seq=1&format=2

You also shouldn't have those hanging loose, they should only be behind a panel.

Here is a full cable run with terminations:
Keystone jack and wall plate --> Wire --> Patch Panel--> RJ-45 Mod -->wire --> RJ-45 Mod --> Switch

You are correct about the cable tester. Plug the remote in one end, the tester on the other, and press test.
 

SpeeDj

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2000
Location
Milwaukee, WI
To clarify you can get a patch panel without jacks in it that you would just snap the keystones into yes. As for patch cables, mono price has killer pricing on any length you would ever need when I did up the house I got a couple 6 inch couple 1.5 ft and some 7 ft cables, could not beat the killer prices :)

Keep the questions coming :)

J :cool:
 

TiZakit

Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Location
Doylestown, Ohio
Speed, didn't know such a panel existed. I've never had the opportunity to use one.

I'd love to wire up my house, but don't know how to get into the basement from the second floor. I wish it were a ranch.