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silver HSF

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k_lined4lyf

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Joined
Mar 28, 2001
Solid silver... nope haven't tried it, nor do I know of any to date that exist. Even if it does, it's just not feasible, regardless of its material properties, in a solid block due to price. It would be weird to see a change to silver in the future, but I never would have forseen copper's popularity to be what it is, so who knows. However, I have seen a silver alloy coated HSF. Not sure what the base material was though.

K-Lined4lyf
 

ocwanabee

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Joined
Jun 17, 2001
I read an article where someone sanded a troy ounce of silver flat on both sides and put it under his hsf and put artic silver2 on both sides he had to modify his hsf spring but I think it helped a couple degrees
 

spyke

Registered
Joined
Mar 14, 2001
Did pretty much the same thing here with a Vantec 6254 (etc.) Lapped a silver dollar to 2000 grit, polished it and attached it w/ 4 aluminum screws to the bottom of the Vantec. Artic silver was used between the silver dollar and the Vantec. Works great. With A 120 mm panaflo blowing in from the side blowhole towards the cpu, and 2 delta 60 mm's om the HS, it keeps the 1ghz oc'd to 1.5 ghz at 42c max load no matter what. I got a pic if anyone wants to see.
 

CalCoolage

Registered
Joined
Jun 30, 2001
Not quite. There is any unusual and hard to find sink named the Silverado that has
a thick slug of silver attached to the bottom as a heat spreader. It is precision machined and polished to a mirror surface. Then is tightly pressure bonded to the bottom with screws. The cost of the silver is about $5. Silver is around $2 an ounce. Using 8 ounces of silver for the base or possibly the whole sink would be $16.
The Silverado is very expensive, because it is made in Germany, but also because
it uses 2 tiny precision, almost silent blowers instead of the usual fan. Nothing that quiet has performed as well, almost as well as the Swiftecs. Those little blowers run about $30 or more a piece and their are 2.

I didn't know till recently that there is something much better than silver, 10 to 100 times better.
 

Magistrate

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Joined
May 20, 2001
CalCoolage (Jun 30, 2001 09:11 a.m.):
I didn't know till recently that there is something much better than silver, 10 to 100 times better.

Care to fill us in on this mystery material?
 

doublec16

Registered
Joined
Apr 3, 2001
Check this out:


As you can see, silver is a slightly better conductor than copper but not by much. Gold is not as good a thermal conductor. Palladium is the best conductor is the best out of all the metals, and in fact out of all the materials listed there. I think it's pretty rare though so it'd be quite expensive. Remember that thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity are not exactly the same thing, though they are both made possible by electrons.
 
S

Sam

Guest
Silver is a much better thermal conduit than gold.

Thermal Properties of Materials

Aluminum 2.165 W/cm-K
Gold 2.913 W/cm-K
Silver 4.173 W/cm-K

Although Gold is a better electrical conduit but definitly not better in thermal disipation.
 

CalCoolage

Registered
Joined
Jun 30, 2001
>Care to fill us in on this mystery material?

I was hoping to find the link which gave the actual, if incredible, numbers, but failed. I stumbled across the info as a link to something or other, possibly from the Anandtech site.

They often mention other amazing properties of this material, so I don't know why they never mention this.

This material could be doped to make transistors that would stand up to much higher temperatures than silicon. It has the same outer election structure as silicon since it is just above it in the periodic table. It can have the same crystal structure, but only takes on that form after being subject to high temperature and pressure such as found deep beneath the earth.

The element of which it is made occurs in all organic compounds.and its oxide is a gas that is required by photosynthetic plants.

This material is ten times as hard as the next hardest naturally occurring material, aluminum oxide.

Marilyn Monroe once sang a song claiming the crystals were a girl's best friend, while she twirled the stuff around strung on a necklace and wiggled erotically.
 

*spazzed*

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2000
Location
hamilton, ontario, canada
CalCoolage (Jul 01, 2001 04:28 a.m.):
>Care to fill us in on this mystery material?

I was hoping to find the link which gave the actual, if incredible, numbers, but failed. I stumbled across the info as a link to something or other, possibly from the Anandtech site.

They often mention other amazing properties of this material, so I don't know why they never mention this.

This material could be doped to make transistors that would stand up to much higher temperatures than silicon. It has the same outer election structure as silicon since it is just above it in the periodic table. It can have the same crystal structure, but only takes on that form after being subject to high temperature and pressure such as found deep beneath the earth.

The element of which it is made occurs in all organic compounds.and its oxide is a gas that is required by photosynthetic plants.

This material is ten times as hard as the next hardest naturally occurring material, aluminum oxide.

Marilyn Monroe once sang a song claiming the crystals were a girl's best friend, while she twirled the stuff around strung on a necklace and wiggled erotically.

Could it be Carbon? It can be found in Diamond, Graphite, Carbon Dioxide etc...
 

sfa ok

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2001
Location
Colorado/Chicago
As far as that mystery material, are you talking about Cusil? (I think that's what it was called) It's really expensive. You might as well do some direct-die cooling, that will give you the least resistance between the die and water. ;D
 

CalCoolage

Registered
Joined
Jun 30, 2001
>Could it be Carbon? It can be found in Diamond, Graphite, Carbon Dioxide etc

Diamond. The article which I can't find concerned ways of forming synthetic diamond in a particular way. (CSL diamond?) It said natural diamond had an even higher thermal conductivity. Getting the cost of synthetic diamond down can make it practical to use in more applications. It is not inconceivable that diamond could one day be as commonly used as aluminum.
Aluminum for a very long time was far more costly than gold. I saw a program which played up this fact. The guy was an art historian and he showed an elaborately decorated object that looked just like some intricate gold work of art, but was made of aluminum. When it was made, aluminum indeed was a fabulously exotic and rare material,.and someone owning an aluminum object showed just how weathly he was.
Then a much better way of freeing aluminum from its compounds was invented. In the early 20th century, aluminum was still somewhat too expensive to use except in specialized applications where lightness was more important than cost. Today it is often the preferred and cheapest material to use. They make throw-away cans from it.

On that link that was posted, you will find that the crystalline silicon which is used to make chips is close to being as good a heat conductor as aluminum, which I also did not know.