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Best RAM for FX-53?

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Quattro

Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2003
Hey guys,

What would be a good RAM choice for a FX-53?
Money is seriously no option, but I need it soon.

Thanks.
 
OP
Quattro

Quattro

Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2003
PC3200?
Is that alright, will that go anything over 200?
What CAS is that?

Have you got a linky?
 
Last edited:

glasszon

Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2004
Quattro: is your fx-53 pin 940 or pin 939? That makes a huge difference to which ram you want to use.
 

ResponsiblAdult

Registered
Joined
Jul 9, 2004
I found this info, I don't know if it's accurate...

"Socket 940 holds AMD's Athlon 64 FX processor (as well as the Opteron). Memory used on this socket must be buffered.
AMD Athlon 64 FX 51, 53 (Sledgehammer) "
 

disk11

Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2003
Location
Charlotte
Take a look at some OCZ EB as well. Comes in pc3200, pc3500, and pc3700 variants.

HungryForHertz, what chips do those OCZ rev 2 sticks use?
 

Syx

Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2004
Location
Lake Bodom
Registered RAM is better, but costs a little more and usually has higher latencies.
The Corsair XMS is probably the best for an FX system, ECC or not.
 

glasszon

Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2004
Syx said:
Registered RAM is better, but costs a little more and usually has higher latencies.
The Corsair XMS is probably the best for an FX system, ECC or not.

No, the extra module only helps to lessen the load on the memory controller, the reason why people don't like them is because they don't overclock well (because not many registered ram out there compared to normal un-buffered ram), and the latency hit. I think what you are trying to say is ECC, which stands for error correction code and it helps computer's stability by being able to correct 1 bit errors and repeat double bit errors, but there is no real use of that on normal computers to justify the cost.
 

ResponsiblAdult

Registered
Joined
Jul 9, 2004
The simple answer, I'm sure the guys at this forum could write a book about it....

Registered memory is a type of buffered memory. When you have registered memory the memory board will have a chip called a register. The register clocks in and clocks out the data by the system clock. Registered modules are slightly slower then non-registered modules, because the registering process takes one clock cycle. Have registered memory improves data transfer by "re-driving" the control signals in the memory chips.

ECC (Error Checking and Correcting) performs "double bit detection and single bit correction." This means that if you have a single bit memory error, the chipset and memory will find and repair the error on the fly without you knowing that it happened. If you have a double bit memory error, it will detect and report it. Using ECC decreases your PC's performance by about 2%. Current technology DRAM is very stable and memory errors are rare, so unless you have a need for ECC, you are better served with non-parity SDRAM