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DDR-PIII

Disabled
Joined
Feb 16, 2002
Location
6p6
CPU::::::::::::process:::::Transistors:::::::: Die Size::::::::L2 Cache
P-4 2.2Ghz:::0.13micron:55 Million:::::::::::146mmSQR:::512KB::::
P-4 2.0Ghz:::0.18micron:42 Million:::::::::::218mmSQR:::256KB::::
P-III-s 1.4Ghz:0.13micron:44 Million:::::::::81mmSQR:::::512KB::::
P-III 733Mhz:0.18micron::28 Million:::::::::106mmSQR::::256KB::::
P-III 500Mhz:0.25micron::9.5 Million::::::::128mmSQR::::External


Can you's help me fill everthing that I didnt get "eg" 2.4Ghz 286
 

stompah

Deep Pain Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2001
DDR-PIII said:
CPUCentral Processing Unit
P-4<~ model name of CPU 2.2Ghzspeed of CPU
P-4 2.0Ghz
P-III-s 1.4Ghz
P-III 733Mhz
P-III 500Mhz



Processbasically this boild down into what size the manufacturing of the CPU
0.13micron
0.18micron
0.13micron
0.18micron
0.25micron


Transistors i cant explain it other than its the # of braincells the CPU has - the more transistors the more brain power the CPU has (theoretically)
55 Million
42 Million
44 Million
28 Million
9.5 Million


Die Size the die is the small area where the 'brains' of the CPu are located. Also known as the core (most of teh time the DIE is visable but one some CPUs it is covered by a metal heat spreader
146mmSQR
218mmSQR
81mmSQR
106mmSQR
128mmSQR


L2 Cache is the amount of memory the CPU has onboard - the external cache is set by the motherboard
512KB
256KB
512KB
256KB
External
I hope I didnt mislead you... if I did I hope forum members are mature enough to correct me in a mature manner
 
OP
DDR-PIII

DDR-PIII

Disabled
Joined
Feb 16, 2002
Location
6p6
howmany "braincells" does aP-4 @2.4Ghz have ?

and in overclocking it still has the same amount of transistors but how does it speed up ?
 

stompah

Deep Pain Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2001
No clue exactly... but the 2.2GHz has 55million.

in overclocking it uses the transistors in more frequency. meaning it uses them quicker and and more times than at defualt speed.

i wish some guys with more knowledge would respond too.
 

Enigma422

Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2002
Location
The Parabolic Quantum Well
DDR-PIII said:
and in overclocking it still has the same amount of transistors but how does it speed up ?

The amount of transistors does not affect how fast the CPU is to a certain degree. It just affects to complexity of the CPU. For example, the current NW CPUs have more transistors than the Willamette CPUs because memory is made up of a lot of transistors and what are known as trench capacitors and since the NW has double the L2 the Willamette had, it has more transistors.

In terms of overclocking the number of transistors have little relavence to how fast your CPU can overclock. As you may know, CPUs and basically anything inside your computer uses binary mathematics, digital, to compute data and do its job. This means, the only numbers a CPU can understand is 0 and 1. A transistor acts like a switch and allows the CPU to distinguish between a 0 and a 1, the 0 meaning off and the 1 meaning on. The combination of transistors in the CPU allow then the CPU to do the complex mathematics involved in data crunching. What you do when you overclock is make these transistors switch on and off faster and this is how you speed up a CPU when you overclock.