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damage due to overclocking?

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NiTCOM

Member
Joined
May 17, 2003
Location
U.S.A. / Germany
Howdy!
I'm probably not the first one to ask this question, but here
it is again :)

How certain is it to damage components or the motherboard or other due to overclocking the CPU? I read about it I don't understand how the CPU could damage others than itself.

My internal network adapter went (apparantly) out, and I accidently had my CPU overclocked so I blame it now for that.
Though, still want to overclock the prozessor if it would be save
(just ordered TT Spark 7 for direct cooling).

Thanks guys!

--NiTCOM
 

skab

Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2003
Location
Montevideo, Minnesota
I don't think that changing the multiplier on the cpu would actualy damage any other components unless the cpu actually shorted out and sent current down a line normaly used for a digital signal. That said the most common OC is to change the front side bus and effectively OC the whole system which is known to cause problems with varios different components, ussualy hard drives from what I've seen. That's why so many OC'rs spend the bucks to get mobo's that will "lock" the pci and agp bus at a freq below 40 mhz to keep them from being damaged.
 

Ben721

Official X-Hour Man
Joined
Feb 3, 2002
Well if you have an older motherboard and if you can't lock the pci controller then crap starts to happen, like bad hdd, and all stuff like nics and stuff like them.
 
OP
NiTCOM

NiTCOM

Member
Joined
May 17, 2003
Location
U.S.A. / Germany
Ben721 said:
Well if you have an older motherboard and if you can't lock the pci controller then crap starts to happen, like bad hdd, and all stuff like nics and stuff like them.

So how can I tell if a MB is able to lock the PCI's?

--NiTCOM
 

Ben721

Official X-Hour Man
Joined
Feb 3, 2002
Well I think you can only do that in NF2 chipsets but I am not sure.

Please state what motherboard you have.
 

katka

Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2003
Location
South Carolina
I'm sure there are mobo with locks that are not NF2. Oh well I'm probly wrong.

Any way if you want to know just go to your mobo makers website and look up the specs on your mobo.
 
OP
NiTCOM

NiTCOM

Member
Joined
May 17, 2003
Location
U.S.A. / Germany
Ben721 said:
Well I think you can only do that in NF2 chipsets but I am not sure.

Please state what motherboard you have.

Asus P4s533

..specs of the mobo... what do I look for? "pci locking" ?


Is it possible to damage a component and under windows it states "working properly" ? :)
 

iD10t

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2003
P4S533 doesn't have a pci lock... basically the number after your fsb value is your pci bus frequency. Pretty much anything at or beyond 38 will be risky and/or unstable. Try a lower pci frequency to see if your adapter re-appears once it is back in an accaeptable frequency.
 
OP
NiTCOM

NiTCOM

Member
Joined
May 17, 2003
Location
U.S.A. / Germany
iD10t said:
P4S533 doesn't have a pci lock... basically the number after your fsb value is your pci bus frequency. Pretty much anything at or beyond 38 will be risky and/or unstable. Try a lower pci frequency to see if your adapter re-appears once it is back in an accaeptable frequency.

So the pci frequency should be OVER 38 oder under 38???!