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Difference between a hub and a repeater?

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Fightingpiper

Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2001
Location
St. Paul, MN
What's the difference. I did a search on the forums and all I found was that some hubs are repeaters. so does that mean all repeaters are not hubs?

Thanks
 

Malakai

New Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2001
Location
Fl
Fightingpiper said:
What's the difference. I did a search on the forums and all I found was that some hubs are repeaters. so does that mean all repeaters are not hubs?

Thanks

i THINK a repeater strenghtens the signal for a network spanned over long distances. im like 90% sure.

this would explain why some hubs can be, and others arent. a hub for a small network wouldnt need to boost the signal, whereas one for a lrge network would
 

Huckleberry

Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2002
Location
Just East of the mall
A hub is a repeater, also known as a multi-port repeater. This include hubs, some transceivers and other various pieces of hardware. It also includes the Netelligent 1016, which is a 16 port 10Mbps hub (or repeater, if you would rather call it that). I've found that in older documentation, companies are more likely to call this type of hardware a repeater rather than the (today) more common name of hub. In short, the 1016 is a 16 port hub, and quite usable in a small network.

Yes, it does amplify the signal. It also amplifies anything else it sees on the line, including noise to some degree. The better repeaters do a better job of amplification. You want to limit the number of repeaters between two computers in order to limit latency and noise. By the same token, you want to reduce as much as possible the length of cable between two computers.

Bridges or switches (aka multiport bridges) actually read the incoming signal, reconstruct the packet and then create a new packet/signal to be sent out the appropriate ports. Thus, they don't amplify what is coming in, but reconstruct a new, fresh packet. They also cost more. If you have a choice between the two, choose a switch. In a small home network you won't go wrong using a hub (and you'll save $$$ too).
 
OP
Fightingpiper

Fightingpiper

Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2001
Location
St. Paul, MN
Thanks thats what I wanted to hear! I was gonna run out of ports on my router and I'll pick one of these up and hope it works. Thanks again!

You Betcha! :) :)

Hey Huckelberry here's my favorite quote of yours......
"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you
didn't
do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away
from
the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream.
Discover." - Mark Twain
 
Last edited:
OP
Fightingpiper

Fightingpiper

Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2001
Location
St. Paul, MN
NOt a problem I didn't write it........Its a great quote That I see on lots of sailing/trawlering sites and lists that I subscribe to. Oh btw i picked up one of these repeaters today. Its only 10baseT but heck its more than enough for my home network. Now I just need 14 more computers. Also I can prolly get 2-3 more of these 16 port 'repeaters' for under 30 bucks if anyone is interested.