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Seagate begins volume shipments of helium filled hard drives

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EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Kenrou said:
Any word on prices and failure rate ?
In the table and in the last paragraph it mentioned the 10TB... nothing on the 8TB...
Amazon currently sells the Seagate Enterprise Capacity 3.5" HDD 10TB (ST10000NM0016) for $695.98 (note that this is not an MSRP), which is far from affordable. Still, keep in mind that we talking about exclusive products based on a brand-new platform. Such HDDs make a lot of sense for datacenters, but, currently, not so much for desktops or NAS units.
 
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Kenrou

Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2014
I know the quantity of Helium inside it must be tiny but the idea of putting something like that inside a potentially very hot zone...
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Not sure where helium's flash point is... but I doubt its as low as 30-40C (give or take a few C)...which is about how warm HDDs get in a 22C ambient area.
 

wagex

Chapstick Eating Premium Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2011
helium is inert so i dont get where this is going.
 

JrClocker

AKA: JrMiyagi
Joined
Sep 25, 2015
Haha - you guys beat me to it! Helium is on the right side of the periodic table of elements !


 

caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
so, the idea is to reduce the platter aero dynamic drag to reduce the power draw of the motor?
 

bob4933

Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Helium hard drives have been around for years. This is nothing new. What IS new is the extremely high platter density.

High, it is Seagate.


Seagates are fine. They had a generational hiccup for their 2012 series models. Seagate 4tb drives are more reliable than WD 4tb drives according to back blaze (who runs petabytes of data and a myriad of drives). The problem models have long since been discontinued as well. Those 3tb WD models aren't exactly stellar long term performers either, but you guys have no problems shilling those for whatever reason.

Oh, and in before the inevitable "lets see this data". Do your own homework.
 
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OP
Evilsizer

Evilsizer

Senior Forum Spammer
Joined
Jun 6, 2002
Helium hard drives have been around for years. This is nothing new. What IS new is the extremely high platter density.
true but i couldn't fit the entire title of the article in the post title for our forum.

*edit*
as you can see here and i will quote
http://www.uigi.com/MSDS_gaseous_H2.html
[Auto-ignition temperature:
1058 ˚F (570 ˚C).]

now with that said
http://www.airships.net/hindenburg/disaster
if their theory is correct about how it started being a electrostatic discharge, that would mean the spark would have needed to be 1058F or higher.
but wait more confliction
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/fuels-ignition-temperatures-d_171.html
says its 932F, so now im confused. For me on the Hindenburg, the question stands if the spark did happen, what temperature did the spark reach. As it seems noted by places with data on hydrogen it rises rapidly as its lighter then air. If this was the case then how could it have burned if it rises rapidly, how fast does it rise since its lighter then air? somethings add up some dont and some things not answered. did they ever find this device that was leaking? this disaster was so big back then in the news, why does it seem like they didnt go through all the wreckage to figure it out.

ok rant off...
 
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EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Seagates are fine. They had a generational hiccup for their 2012 series models.

Oh, and in before the inevitable "lets see this data". Do your own homework.
just curious, are these 2012 model drives?
https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-drive-reliability-stats-for-q2-2015/

I like the data there, but that environment really is a worst case. I don't know anyone that beats on consumer level drives in a Datacenter. I would imagine the failure rates are a lot lower across ALL brands using a normal usage model.

Read the update from 2/2016 and came across this:
A relevant observation from our Operations team on the Seagate drives is that they generally signal their impending failure via their SMART stats. Since we monitor several SMART stats, we are often warned of trouble before a pending failure and can take appropriate action. Drive failures from the other manufacturers appear to be less predictable via SMART stats


Typically when going against what is commonly held as conventional wisdom (albeit right or wrong) it's up to that person to provide supporting evidence. :)
 
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Mr.Scott

Beamed Me Up!
Joined
Jun 9, 2013
High, it is Seagate.
Very WD fanboyish thing to say.
Seagates failure rate in no different than anybody elses.

- - - Updated - - -

I have a box of dead Seagate HDDs that wish to disagree. LOL

I have boxes full of everybody's dead drives that says they're all equal give or take a percent or so.

Except for the Deathstars. They pretty much lead the pack.
 

ShrimpBrime

~MadHatDeLidder~
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
LOL. Again with Seagate vs WD.

I've killed more WD drives because throughout the years been so praised. So have purchased more of them and consequently killed more of them.

What's that feeling when you kill a 10,000 rpm raptor? NOT GOOD!

However I do have Seagate drives that where used pretty much for benching only that are years old still going strong, but have also killed a good handful of them.

Longest lasting drive with pure beat downs.... Patriot Torqx (original drive) SSD. Have benched several platforms with this and includes extreme cooling and overclocking. (many many many blue screens now...)

Current back ups and Storage are now being run on WD Greeen drives. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136737 Had these drives for years now. Hae used for operating systems in raid 0 just for testing for gaming. Not exactly slow drives for any purpose. But had purchased these for the 64mb cache.
 

bob4933

Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Very WD fanboyish thing to say.
Seagates failure rate in no different than anybody elses.

- - - Updated - - -



I have boxes full of everybody's dead drives that says they're all equal give or take a percent or so.

Except for the Deathstars. They pretty much lead the pack.

That 1.5tb drive though... If anything all are equal minus hgst. Good Lord those are reliable . (ironically my only failed drive is a 2tb hgst)

just curious, are these 2012 model drives?
https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-drive-reliability-stats-for-q2-2015/

I like the data there, but that environment really is a worst case. I don't know anyone that beats on consumer level drives in a Datacenter. I would imagine the failure rates are a lot lower across ALL brands using a normal usage model.

Read the update from 2/2016 and came across this:


Typically when going against what is commonly held as conventional wisdom (albeit right or wrong) it's up to that person to provide supporting evidence. :)



Correct, those are models from 2012 (yes I can see the post date).
And to a few of you, any source I put up holds about as much weight as tissue paper on fire. I'd rather people stay on top of the curve themselves, and it's easier to figure out for yourself than have me show you....

That and I'm on my phone and copy pasting links suck...
 
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