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Shared Linksys router, want to cap the other users bandwidth

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itizme

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2002
Location
Barrie
Don't think it is possible, or is it? Can I limit the bandwith of another user on my router, even if I gave him 2 or 3 bits an hour he would be ok I think.
That is without using my resources to host the internet connection.
One sad gamer, with one stupid heart that shared his wan!
:(
 

Mi6

Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2001
Location
Montreal & Toronto
CyberFed said:
3rd party software might be able to do that, or else you will need a router with load balancing software


i was actualy looking into that. would you happen to have a few names of routers for me to look up on?
 

Kingslayer

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2001
Location
Port Charlotte, Florida
You cant do it with a router. We'll you cant do it with cheap broadband (cable/dsl) aimed routers. That encompasses the linksys...

Third party software is useless to you because it has to be installed on the gateway in order to work. The gateway in your network is the router. You can't install that software on your router. Now if you ditched the router and used ICS then you could do it, but ICS is a pain compared to a router.
 

JasonKosi

Member
If you're willing to blow a couple thousand $$$ I imagine that Cisco 1600 series routers will work just fine. I know that the 2600 series will do it, but thats just overkill :)

But seriously...
Part of what makes expensive routers, well, expensive, this that they offer software packages to handle things like this.
You won't be able to do it with anything that you payed $100 for at Best Buy.

I believe that Nerd4Life is on the right track. Look for a way to limit it on the client machine as opposed to the router.
 

alrox

Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2002
One of freebsd's base firewall/nat packages is called ipfw2, and it will let you rate limit a connection based on various layer3 specifics of a connection. If setting up a bsd box as your main gateway is an option, I'd suggest going this route.

JasonKosi said:
If you're willing to blow a couple thousand $$$ I imagine that Cisco 1600 series routers will work just fine. I know that the 2600 series will do it, but thats just overkill :)

But seriously...
Part of what makes expensive routers, well, expensive, this that they offer software packages to handle things like this.
You won't be able to do it with anything that you payed $100 for at Best Buy.

I believe that Nerd4Life is on the right track. Look for a way to limit it on the client machine as opposed to the router.
 

Kingslayer

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2001
Location
Port Charlotte, Florida
JasonKosi said:
If you're willing to blow a couple thousand $$$ I imagine that Cisco 1600 series routers will work just fine. I know that the 2600 series will do it, but thats just overkill :)

But seriously...
Part of what makes expensive routers, well, expensive, this that they offer software packages to handle things like this.
You won't be able to do it with anything that you payed $100 for at Best Buy.

I believe that Nerd4Life is on the right track. Look for a way to limit it on the client machine as opposed to the router.

Actually it can't be done on the Cisco Routers either. You can control the bandwidth of the ports, but those routers you mention only have one ethernet port. (the 2600 comes stock with one, you can add more though) You actually need to get down to the switch level to control the bandwidth on the Cisco's. One the more expensive Cisco's or the ones with multiple ethernet ports you can control the bandwidth. You can also do it on any of the routers with VOIP, IDSN, or Dialup cards installed on a port by port basis.
 

eh?

Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2001
Location
Elkhart, Indiana
Kingslayer said:


Actually it can't be done on the Cisco Routers either. You can control the bandwidth of the ports, but those routers you mention only have one ethernet port. (the 2600 comes stock with one, you can add more though) You actually need to get down to the switch level to control the bandwidth on the Cisco's. One the more expensive Cisco's or the ones with multiple ethernet ports you can control the bandwidth. You can also do it on any of the routers with VOIP, IDSN, or Dialup cards installed on a port by port basis.
beat me to it! the only way i can think of off the top of my head is what kinslayer said. Unless you bought another nic and ran the broand band trough your computer and found some 3rd party software that would do it
 

Kingslayer

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2001
Location
Port Charlotte, Florida
He COULD play around with the MTU but that's not really going to slow down a 1.5 meg connection. Probably won't even phase it. The only thing that it will, for sure, do is make file transfers from one computer to the other an absolute nightmare.

Playing with the MTU is going to throtte back the whole NIC, not just the internet connection. But like I said, I don't think it will slow down the 1.5 meg or whatever his broadband connection is. It will still squeek through.

I can understand his frustration. I have 4 computers on my network, one of them being the FTP/Web/Email server for my domain. I had to put time limits on the FTP so I could play my game without interruption. But it never fails. I'll be layin a whoopin on everyone and the wife will sneak on her computer to surf QVC.

Man that's annoying. Like there's anything more important on QVC.
 

eh?

Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2001
Location
Elkhart, Indiana
Kingslayer said:
He COULD play around with the MTU but that's not really going to slow down a 1.5 meg connection. Probably won't even phase it. The only thing that it will, for sure, do is make file transfers from one computer to the other an absolute nightmare.

Playing with the MTU is going to throtte back the whole NIC, not just the internet connection. But like I said, I don't think it will slow down the 1.5 meg or whatever his broadband connection is. It will still squeek through.

I can understand his frustration. I have 4 computers on my network, one of them being the FTP/Web/Email server for my domain. I had to put time limits on the FTP so I could play my game without interruption. But it never fails. I'll be layin a whoopin on everyone and the wife will sneak on her computer to surf QVC.

Man that's annoying. Like there's anything more important on QVC.
ahh yes, the women. My girlfriend is into e-bay, sigh...
 

JasonKosi

Member
Kingslayer said:


Actually it can't be done on the Cisco Routers either. You can control the bandwidth of the ports, but those routers you mention only have one ethernet port. (the 2600 comes stock with one, you can add more though) You actually need to get down to the switch level to control the bandwidth on the Cisco's. One the more expensive Cisco's or the ones with multiple ethernet ports you can control the bandwidth. You can also do it on any of the routers with VOIP, IDSN, or Dialup cards installed on a port by port basis.

My apologies, I should've been more specific.

I referring to the general series of routers, not specific models like the 2621 with the extra ethernet port or the 2651 with boosted cpu and extra ethernet port (these two were the most common router types used at my last job... before my manager figured out that you can't stick 500 users with 6Mbit of bandwidth on them AND run NAT on them at the same time... P2P and Code Red ate them ALIVE).

In any event, you CAN set rate limits on them and it does work. You can even pull bandwidth usage data off of them through SNMP or netflow and lock down severe abusers (oh man, was that fun :) ).

Originally posted by Warlord2


you can play around with her registry.

That just sounds dirty :beer:
 

su root

Senior Member, --, I teach people how to read your
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Location
Ontario, Canada
I know of a program that will limit the bandwidth of a computer. It's a tool for programmers, so they can test network-intensive programs at different speeds, ie: 14.4, 28.8, etc.

I'm not at my computer right now, so I can't tell you what the name of it is, and I can't find it right now.