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starter kit for rigid tube

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caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
does anybody offer a fairly complete starter kit of tooling for rigid tubing?
what's actually needed?
 

DNRDustin

Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2015
Location
Pensacola, Fl
you need a silicon insert tube(PPC's.com), some olive oil($ store), a heat gun([email protected] freight), hack saw($ store), sand paper($ store), and half a brain(I'm not sure where to buy this, if you do let me know). all that other hooplah is just fluff! I would encourage using petg over acrylic, much easier to work with!
 
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OP
caddi daddi

caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
I have read that about pteg tube.
I have a thermaltake core p5 incoming and i just don't think soft tube is such a good idea in a fully exposed case.
I am also reading that 350-375F if about right for pteg tube, does this jibe with what you guys have found?
 

ProgramGuy

Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2015
Location
Romeoville, IL
I just did my first rigid tubing build using the Monsoon tools and it worked out just fine. Using their rulers to measure out how all the bends were laid out made it extremely easy. The biggest issue I had was how flexible the tubing had to be before trying to bend. If you do it prematurely, it could cause a kink. I would suggest getting a couple extra pieces of tubing to play around with. I would do it again in a heartbeat!
 

Mandrake4565

Mr. Clean Senior Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2012
Caddi, you sure you want to use rigid tubing? You swap parts around all the time, just ask Bassnut about the endeavors of rigid tubing and changing parts.
 
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dylskee

Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2005
Location
Central MA
There is some good youtube videos as well, I'm going to do a rigid setup as well but on an older platform, it just looks so cool! That's a pretty decent kit, make sure you post lots of pics as you go! :thup:
 
OP
caddi daddi

caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
Manny, I'm thinking my gaming rig is as far as it's going to go, a 4790K and 2 980ti's should carry me quite some time. the other rigs will all remain soft tube and quick disconnects to the loop.
 

Mandrake4565

Mr. Clean Senior Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2012
Manny, I'm thinking my gaming rig is as far as it's going to go, a 4790K and 2 980ti's should carry me quite some time. the other rigs will all remain soft tube and quick disconnects to the loop.
Sounds good, I just know how often you're swapping parts. If things will remain the same for a while then I don't see any issue. I actually like the way rigid tubing looks, I just am always swapping parts around.
 
OP
caddi daddi

caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
Caddi, you sure you want to use rigid tubing? You swap parts around all the time, just ask Bassnut about the endeavors of rigid tubing and changing parts.



I'll have to do a little thinking about that......
 

bassnut

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2009
Take it from me ...... if you go ridged don't plan on swapping things out unless you are prepared to drain the loop each and every time. Another big issue when bending watch how much you heat your tube if you get ANY bubbles in the heated acrylic junk it and start over. Your corners or bends can get brittle as you stretch out the outside radius those little bubbles can be almost the entire thickness of the acrylic and a slight bit of pressure can cause a leak. This happened to me when switching out some ram and I have 2 dead Asus 560Ti 448 core cards sitting in boxes.
 

GTXJackBauer

Water Cooling Senior Member, #TEAMH20HNO
Joined
May 22, 2011
Location
USA
I've been hearing about some are getting cracks on their bends. Best bet in this case would be to try and use fittings for the angles and use the rigid tubing for straights only.
 

dylskee

Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2005
Location
Central MA
I've been hearing about some are getting cracks on their bends. Best bet in this case would be to try and use fittings for the angles and use the rigid tubing for straights only.

That's actually a great idea, as long as it's laid out carefully straights or even slight bends is the best way to go.