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Testing for CPU damage from overheating

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eco_bach

Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Hi
Recently experienced catastrophic cooling failure, where my cooling hose unknown to me, detached from my radiator.
So was running my cpu, i7 6900K , for several hours without proper cooling.

My machine eventually shut down by itself and was unable to reboot before I discovered the cooling failure. AFAIK, NO coolant splashed on my MOBO.

About to install a replacement water cooling unit and will be faced with 2 scenarios

1) My machine boots as normal

2)My machine does not boot due to damage to either CPU and or MOBO.


If #1 is the case and am able to reboot, is there still possibility of damage due to overheating and if so, how do you test for this?
 

cdawall

Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2009
Location
cypress, tx
If it boots it is fine. They will typically shut down before damage. That being said I have had some at work that people installed the AMD screws into an LGA2011 board causing **** contact with the CPU. Those typically have a bad board and CPU.
 

Blaylock

"That Backfired" Senior Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2013
Location
Go Blue!
Intel CPU's are designed to shut down when the temps get too high to prevent damage. It is possible to damage them this way but unlikely. You should really be sure that there is no water any where it does not belong before applying power again.

If you'd like to test it for damage I would run Prime95 for 2 hours with the system at stock (i.e. no overclock) to see if it is stable. If so you're good to go. While running Prime95 its a good idea to also have HWMonitor up and running so you can monitor your temps. P95 will test your coolers ability too. :)

Good luck, I hope all is OK.
 
OP
E

eco_bach

Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Intel CPU's are designed to shut down when the temps get too high to prevent damage. It is possible to damage them this way but unlikely. You should really be sure that there is no water any where it does not belong before applying power again.

If you'd like to test it for damage I would run Prime95 for 2 hours with the system at stock (i.e. no overclock) to see if it is stable. If so you're good to go. While running Prime95 its a good idea to also have HWMonitor up and running so you can monitor your temps. P95 will test your coolers ability too. :)

Good luck, I hope all is OK.

Thanks, appreciated!