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WD MYCLOUD

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caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
WD says to plug this thing directly into my Comcast cable modem but, man is it dog slow.
should I plug it into my gigabit switch.
it's for local, bulk storage and backups, I don't need, nor want to access it via the net.
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2005
Plug it directly into your modem...? Don't see how that'll work unless it's got some sort of ethernet pass through, as most modems I've seen have only one ethernet port. But yeah, I don't see why you can't plug it into a switch/router and access it locally only. I'm not 100% certain on this but WD may just say that to not have to walk customers through router firewall configurations, NAT, all that.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
What are you using this device for? Are you using it for on the fly read and write storage as you compute? Or, are you using it for backup only?

No matter how you hook it up you will find it slow if you are using it in the first sense. And if any leg of your network is slower than 1 gigabit then plugging it into the gigabit switch will not help. It's the weakest link that will determine the speed.

I have a 5 TB USB 3.0 external hard drive plugged into my router's USB port that is available to all the PCs on the network. But I only use it for storing backups and images. I don't use it as read/write storage in my daily computing. The imaging and backing up is scheduled to be done in the wee hours so it makes no difference to me if it's slow.

Don't expect NAS to give you read/write speeds like a hard drive directly attached to your computer.
 
OP
caddi daddi

caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
it was just for backups and long term storage.
even plugged directly in to the nic on the computer it was dog slow.
the issue that has killed it is that to access it you have to go to a WD web site to sign in so if your net is down you are screwed,
I'm sending it back and just grabbing a giant usb external drive.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
I think you will find the USB external drive to be a much more desirable solution. If you are backing up more than one PC on the network the USB drive will be available to the other PCs on the network as long as the computer it is attached to is up and running. If course, network discovery would have to be turned on for all machines involved.
 
OP
caddi daddi

caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
I see that Seagate has an 8 tb usb 3.0 unit, that's the way I'm going.
why would WD make it so you have to go to their server to get data from a drive across the room?????
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
I'm guessing it affords an extra layer of backup security? Is the data also backed up on their server or at least is there the option to do that for a fee? I'm keying on the name for the device, "MY Cloud."

It may also facilitate remote management from offsite.
 
OP
caddi daddi

caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
I didn't look into what might or might be stored on their servers.

it was for remote/internet access and management.
I assume that is why you had to log into it from their server, mycloud.com.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
So it sounds like the device is better suited for a niche different than what you want to do with it.
 
OP
caddi daddi

caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
that's correct, too secure to do what I want for the most part, if it was for a small office where more than one person needed access I can see it.
it's just me and the bee and I'm getting lazy.
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2005
that's correct, too secure to do what I want for the most part, if it was for a small office where more than one person needed access I can see it.
it's just me and the bee and I'm getting lazy.

I'm going out on a limb and say the exact opposite, it's designed for the average consumer and not a business setting. My line of thinking being your typical home user isn't going to have a static outward facing IP, so the Mycloud phones to WDs servers and users don't need to check their IPs every few days. Many "Business" class internet connections will have a static IP, at least from what I've seen, so there really isn't that need to have a device that constantly reports it.


If that has anything to do with it :D
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
So that theory fits well with the remote off site management I spoke about it would seem. It ensures you have access to it.