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First time overclocking new Clarkdale i3 530

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koala-czyk

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Joined
Jan 20, 2010
New to overclocking. I am not looking for step-by-step (I am going to attempt to do some homework if I can find some time), but I would like some input.

PC parts are due in tomorrow - very excited..

Intel i3 530 CPU

ASUS P7H57D-V EVO LGA 1156 Intel H57 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

Corsair H50 cooling (push/pull)

G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)

Going to use onboard GPU (I don't game). I am hoping I have a nice picture for 1080p...

Just looking for any thoughts for my setup. I should have plenty of circulation (2 250mm fans + (2) 120 mm in rear for push/pull). Not sure about timings, etc but I am going to figure out what I need to do to reach a nice speed.

Also on another note.. Has anyone heard about GPU performance with this CPU? I heard there may be driver issues? I have a feeling I may end up buying PCIex card although that will defeat the purpose of the mobo..

Thanks for all the help in advance!



 

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  • complete build.doc
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MIAHALLEN

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2007
:welcome: to OCF!

Looks like a great budget build there...if not for gaming...what will you use it for?
Onboard GPU will fine...Intel have an excellent track record with their GPU drivers, so don't worry about that, if you're not gaming, this should be fine even long term (unless you need a lot of GPGPU power).

Looks like a decent selection of parts, keep us posted on your results ;)
 
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koala-czyk

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Jan 20, 2010
Going to stream HD movies to either my WDTV Live or run on monitor itself. Want to keep this thing on and running as much as possible for downloading etc. May try folding..

Homework..

Nothing crazy though. I just wanted a nice machine that would last a while and not get outgrown by technology THAT fast. Has USB 3.0 and Sata 6 GB so it should be ok. Still trying to figure out multipliers, timings etc.. Reading up as much as I can b4 it gets here... Got a nice 32" 1080 monitor to run off of it.
 

MIAHALLEN

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2007
Keep your eyes open for my overclocking guide...should be posted on the front page within a few days.
 
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koala-czyk

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Jan 20, 2010
I will look for your guide. I am nervous about setting the timings wrong or pushing the cpu too hard. Might be easy after I am looking at the screen and fiddle a bit but I dont know. Let me know what you are running etc.
 

karkas

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Joined
May 7, 2008
Location
Phoenix, AZ
I will look for your guide. I am nervous about setting the timings wrong or pushing the cpu too hard. Might be easy after I am looking at the screen and fiddle a bit but I dont know. Let me know what you are running etc.

Its almost impossible to permanently break something unless you are manually increasing voltages or completely ignoring CPU temps.
 
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koala-czyk

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Jan 20, 2010
Thank you for reassuring me.

I have read to push CPU as far as it will go (without problems), and utilizing the voltage as a last resort. Is this correct?

Will RAM timings lineup as I asjust CPU speeds or is this something I have to manually change as well.

My mobo is DDR3 2133 (OC)/1600/1333/1066 and my RAM is DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)
Cas Latency 9
Timing 9-9-9-24-2N

Should i try to push the memory to 2133 to match the mobo? And if so, is this simply lowering the timing?

I apologise if these are ignorant questions.. I have been doing a lot of reading and in a couple days have a descent grasp although I will not start any of this until tomorrow night..


These CPU's run well under increased voltage? I think my cooling should be pretty well so if I have to increase voltage that will be ok?

When I start OC'ing how high should I start - i.e. where is everyone having success at for these new CPUs with cooling similar to mine (4GHz, 5 GHz, etc)?
 
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koala-czyk

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Jan 20, 2010
I read this review on Newegg for the ASUS P7H57D-V EVO:

For those wondering about the graphics: In the Core i3/5/7 series, Intel added integrated graphics into the CPU (not on all models!), so the Mainboard needs to supply the outputs. If you use a CPU without integrated graphics (i.e. the i7-8xx) then the outputs are useless. So make sure to get a Graphics Card.


Is he saying that I will need a graphics card also? Not sure what he is trying to get across.
 

Evilsizer

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Jun 6, 2002
I read this review on Newegg for the ASUS P7H57D-V EVO:

For those wondering about the graphics: In the Core i3/5/7 series, Intel added integrated graphics into the CPU (not on all models!), so the Mainboard needs to supply the outputs. If you use a CPU without integrated graphics (i.e. the i7-8xx) then the outputs are useless. So make sure to get a Graphics Card.


Is he saying that I will need a graphics card also? Not sure what he is trying to get across.

im sure yor aware but to be more accurate. only the new G9xxx,i3,i5 6xx have onboard graphics. what he is saying is if you got the i5 750 or higher that doesnt have on package graphics. only reason to get a H55 or H57 based baord is because of the on package graphics.

in a nute shell no you dont need a add-in gpu.
 

karkas

Member
Joined
May 7, 2008
Location
Phoenix, AZ
I read this review on Newegg for the ASUS P7H57D-V EVO:

For those wondering about the graphics: In the Core i3/5/7 series, Intel added integrated graphics into the CPU (not on all models!), so the Mainboard needs to supply the outputs. If you use a CPU without integrated graphics (i.e. the i7-8xx) then the outputs are useless. So make sure to get a Graphics Card.


Is he saying that I will need a graphics card also? Not sure what he is trying to get across.

See my sig to clear up the iSeries CPU confusion.
 
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koala-czyk

Registered
Joined
Jan 20, 2010
I started puting some things together tonight but just a couple things (I need sleep)...

My question is,

For the H50 cooling push/pull:

My case came with 120 mm rear fan which has mobo connector. I replaced this with a better fan, but the connector is a 4 pin connector that hooks direct to PSU.

I want my mobo to be able to control fan speed.

What is the best recommendation?

Sorry if this is a dumb question, I just want to have the best solution for cooling.
 

Evilsizer

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Jun 6, 2002
what fan did you get, that will answer the question. as not all fans will be able to be used on motherboard fan headers.
 

Theocnoob

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Dec 1, 2007
Location
Near Toronto Canada
Going to stream HD movies to either my WDTV Live or run on monitor itself. Want to keep this thing on and running as much as possible for downloading etc. May try folding..

Homework..

Nothing crazy though. I just wanted a nice machine that would last a while and not get outgrown by technology THAT fast. Has USB 3.0 and Sata 6 GB so it should be ok. Still trying to figure out multipliers, timings etc.. Reading up as much as I can b4 it gets here... Got a nice 32" 1080 monitor to run off of it.

Good thing is having an 1156 board you can always go to an i7 when the lethargic i3 isn't enough for you. Very quickly can turn into a gaming rig for $300 if you want to.
 
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koala-czyk

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Jan 20, 2010
what fan did you get, that will answer the question. as not all fans will be able to be used on motherboard fan headers.

The fans are

APEVIA CF12SL-UBL 120mm Blue LED Case Fan

If you look at the top I attached all my parts. I think I will have to run these push/pull fans 24/7 because they are molex - or get an adaptor. The fan that came with the case was connected via 4 pin (mini???), and when I disconnected it I figured the new fan would plug in. Kind of hard to explain but no big deal. The 2 huge 250 mm fans will run off the board and I should be able to select color and fan speed.

Finishing build tonight :)

Thank you all for all the help - it is greatly appreciated.

Shawn
 
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koala-czyk

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Jan 20, 2010
Also bought "VIZO VIZO-SCB-BL Cable Binding Kit (UV Blue) - Retail".

1 - I don't have a heat gun for the heat wrap.

2 - The blue "cable organizers" wont fit on anything. Let me rephrase. They will fit around cables, but the connectors on the end are what kill the deal. I was thinking you split the sleeving opened?? But you dont. I dont think I am gonna use any of this.
 

Evilsizer

Senior Forum Spammer
Joined
Jun 6, 2002
The fans are

APEVIA CF12SL-UBL 120mm Blue LED Case Fan

If you look at the top I attached all my parts. I think I will have to run these push/pull fans 24/7 because they are molex - or get an adaptor. The fan that came with the case was connected via 4 pin (mini???), and when I disconnected it I figured the new fan would plug in. Kind of hard to explain but no big deal. The 2 huge 250 mm fans will run off the board and I should be able to select color and fan speed.

Finishing build tonight :)

Thank you all for all the help - it is greatly appreciated.

Shawn
yes there is a 4 pin PWM for fans, like this fan
http://www.performance-pcs.com/cata...ge=product_info&cPath=36_49&products_id=24586
PWM is a different mode of changing fan speed. that fan would have no problem being powered off the 3pin mobo fan header. the size of the fan doesnt dictate if it can be powered of the mobo fan header. it is the amount of AMPS the fan pulls, the onboard headers cant handle that much.
 
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koala-czyk

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Jan 20, 2010
yes there is a 4 pin PWM for fans, like this fan
http://www.performance-pcs.com/cata...ge=product_info&cPath=36_49&products_id=24586
PWM is a different mode of changing fan speed. that fan would have no problem being powered off the 3pin mobo fan header. the size of the fan doesnt dictate if it can be powered of the mobo fan header. it is the amount of AMPS the fan pulls, the onboard headers cant handle that much.

My problem is that the connector is not PWM, it is a PSU connector.
 
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koala-czyk

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Jan 20, 2010
yep im aware, 4 pin molex is what they put on it, pass thru power.

Ok, here is the question then. By the looks at my case, I also bought the H50 (which comes with a fan), and the 2 Apevia fans.

I want to do a push pull with the H50 but I would like to keep my fan control (and also be able to adjust LED's etc).

If I keep the stock case fan on the rear, then the radiator, then an Apevia fan, I would have 2 different fans on either side of the radiator (Apevia would be constantly on, and the stock case fan would be controlled). Would this be ok, or should i just stick to the 2 Apevia fans running constant with no control?

The idea was to have identical fans on either side of the radiator, and if I do it right, there will be no control.

Back to the case - I am going to have one of the 250mm fans as exhaust and one as intake.

Keep in mind that I still have the stock H50 fan as well. will end up with 2 extra fans, which is ok - I will just hang on to them.

Any recommendations for best fan setup based on what I stated and my equipment (see attached at top)?
 

jason4207

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2005
Location
Concord, NC
Thank you for reassuring me.

I have read to push CPU as far as it will go (without problems), and utilizing the voltage as a last resort. Is this correct?

Will RAM timings lineup as I asjust CPU speeds or is this something I have to manually change as well.

My mobo is DDR3 2133 (OC)/1600/1333/1066 and my RAM is DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)
Cas Latency 9
Timing 9-9-9-24-2N

Should i try to push the memory to 2133 to match the mobo? And if so, is this simply lowering the timing?

I apologise if these are ignorant questions.. I have been doing a lot of reading and in a couple days have a descent grasp although I will not start any of this until tomorrow night..


These CPU's run well under increased voltage? I think my cooling should be pretty well so if I have to increase voltage that will be ok?

When I start OC'ing how high should I start - i.e. where is everyone having success at for these new CPUs with cooling similar to mine (4GHz, 5 GHz, etc)?

I would say to manually set the voltage from the get-go. If not it will probably be on auto, and raising the speed will cause the mobo to automatically raise the vcore...usually a lot more than is really needed.

Give yourself a limit to start...I'm not sure about the newer i3/i5/i7 stuff, but I set 1.45v (as seen in CPU-Z) as my limit for 45nm Core2, and try to stay under 1.35v if possible. Then find out your VID (use RealTemp or CoreTemp). Set your BIOS vcore so that when you run P95 full-load you see something fairly close to your VID in CPU-Z. That's a good starting point.

Keep increasing speed and use P95 or LINX to do some quick testing along the way. I just go for a few minutes and keep pushing the speed up until it fails pretty quick, and then I start running it longer to fine-tune as I make adjustments.

I also like to try and adjust other settings besides vcore when I'm at the edge-of-stability (fails P95 in less than 5 mins). That way I can see fairly quickly if something is helping or hurting. If nothing else helps then I resort to more vcore.



About the RAM/mobo...the 2133/1600/1333/1066 rating really refers to the RAM multipliers available. You can run 1066, 1333, or 1600 RAM at it's rated speed w/o having to change the BCLK speed. When your OCing you can really just throw all those mobo ratings out the window since you will be adjusting the BCLK. While testing out the limits of the CPU you should keep the RAM at or below its rated speed and timings and at or slightly above it's rated voltage. That way you can be certain if you're having stability issues that it's the CPU you need to look. It's best to focus on 1 sub-system at a time, so do the CPU first, and then go back and tweak out the RAM if you feel so inclined.

To tweak RAM you can approach it from 2 sides: speed and timings. The higher the speed and the lower the timings are the more responsive the RAM will be. It's a balancing act. Timings are how many clock cycles the RAM has to wait before responding to an input; the lower the better. You can increase RAM voltage to help you along, but you have to be careful and not go too high as it is a lot more delicate than the CPU. I don't have any experience w/ the i-line, but I know you have to factor in the memory controller voltage and the difference b/n the memory controller voltage, the RAM voltage, some other voltage (QPI or DMI?), and the vcore can't be too far apart for everything to be happy. Hopefully, someone else can elaborate more on the guidelines in this regard.