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ARM steps up chip performance to catch Intel, AMD

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Janus67

Benching Team Leader
Joined
May 29, 2005
That's great and all, but unless they run the same instruction sets are they truly comparable?
 

Dolk

I once overclocked an Intel
Joined
Mar 3, 2008
What this article fails to point out is the significance this plays in server/workstation side rather than desktop side.

ARM has been trying to get into the server market for awhile and there is definitely applications that can benefit with ARM over x86. What this article also fails to mention is that TSMC has signed a deal with ARM to produce the first 7nm devices. This is significant because TSMC will beat Intel (for the first time I believe) to market with a new feature size. Intel is expected to enter the 7nm market a few quarters after TSMC. If this is timed correctly with the release of the 15th Generation of Server and Workstation platforms, ARM could start creating its own market or take small bits from x86.

Windows Server ARM edition is in trials and could have a fully working OS by this time.
 
OP
Evilsizer

Evilsizer

Senior Forum Spammer
Joined
Jun 6, 2002
it did mention HPC that is assuming what i thought they were going after more then say cell phones or cheap single board pc's. the way i took it is it would be an extension of the current instruction set but a provisions for HPC environments for multi cpu setups.

i mean a server with an octor core controller what possibly up to 16 or more separate cpus with quad or octo cores that can be turned off and on as needed. sounds like a killer ECO_HPC to me if that is in fact what they are doing and after. arm's lower power and TDP vs intel/amd i think gives them a big advantage, only thing that is lacking is software to take more advantage of the HW arm is putting out. i remember reading about the battle of risc vs x86 back in the day, risc just seemed the better way to go. however X86 had more software for it and cpu speeds were increasing at a faster pace then Risc cpus which is a bit of a shame. that is after all what mac's power pc cpus were based on from Motorola back in the day. then apple finaly gave in and went to intel hw since the power pc cpus just couldnt match them any more more or keep pace with clock speed increases.
 

Dolk

I once overclocked an Intel
Joined
Mar 3, 2008
x86 is RISC, its just a different style of RISC that incorporates CISC functionality.

ARM is almost entirely RISC, and its bringing in RISC V architecture which is similar to x86. Which means RISC V is RISC that incorporates a bit of x86 which incorporates a bit of CISC.

I like marry-go-rounds.
 

Bluefalcon13

Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2008
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
x86 is RISC, its just a different style of RISC that incorporates CISC functionality.

ARM is almost entirely RISC, and its bringing in RISC V architecture which is similar to x86. Which means RISC V is RISC that incorporates a bit of x86 which incorporates a bit of CISC.

I like marry-go-rounds.
I need more coffee to understand the circular relationship better [emoji14]
 

Dolk

I once overclocked an Intel
Joined
Mar 3, 2008
x86 is equivalent to a combined CISC RISC chip, but heavily favors RISC

RISC V is aiming to be equivalent to x86, but still be heavily rooted in RISC.
 

Kenrou

Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2014
Wasn't the Apple A10 (iPhone 7) being compared to desktop chips a few months ago as well ? 3400+ single thread in geekbench 4.
 

Dolk

I once overclocked an Intel
Joined
Mar 3, 2008
Apple A10 is I believe a very good ARM PROC. ARM can have a variety of flavors to its ISA depending on which IPs are being implemented. So you can design a very good ARM chip, but not consistently across multiple companies.