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First time Overclocking - please help me

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LaskoAA

Registered
Joined
Mar 24, 2017
Hi All,

I am very excited to attempt my first overclock but I am also a little nervous because I have never attempted this before and I'm not sure exactly what to do...

The steps for overclocking as I understand are below:

1. Remove my old CPU.
2. Install my new CPU and Cooler.
3. Turn the computer on and enter the Bios.
4. Within the bios I disable turbo boost (not sure where there is done?).
5. I raise the vcore to 1.2v.
6. I raise the multiplier to 42 (which translates to 4.2GHz).
7. I set the CPU voltage to "adaptive".
8. Restart computer.
9. Download CPUID "Hardware Monitor" software.

Is that all? Am I missing anything?

Do I need to update anything with my motherboard (i keep hearing the term "flash the bios").


My current build is below:

Processor: I just bought a brand new Intel Core i7-2700K Sandy Bridge. I currently have an i5-2300 Sandy Bridge so I will be swapping that out for the i7-2700K.

CPU Cooler: CRYORIG H7 (will need to install with the 2700K).

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA4UF2DZ6565

Power: CORSAIR CX Series CX600 600W

Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 970 FTW+ w/ACX 2.0+

Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-Z68AP-D3(R2.0) LGA 1155 Intel Z68

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128538

Memory: 16 gig (Two G.SKILL Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1866)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231460

Hard Drive: 500 gig SSD

Monitor: BenQ 2430 (but thinking about getting the Asus ROG SWIFT PG248Q (not sure which monitor is better)).

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824014576


Thanks so much for your help!



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trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
You seem to be on the right track. But you also need to download and install some other helper software such as CPU-z for reporting information to us when requested and something to stress test the overclock settings, for example Prime95 v. 27.7.

While you stress test with Prime95 you should have HWMonitor open to monitor temps. You want core temps/package temp to not exceed 90c. You don't want to give the CPU more than about 1.375 volts but if temps max core/package temps exceed 90c you will not be able to give it that much. Stress test for 20 minute periods at first but as you zero in on your max overclock, use two hour stress tests. When you fail a stress test (blue screen, spontaneous restart, one or more Prime95 core workers drop out) then you need more CPU voltage or if temps and voltages are already getting maxed then you need to back off on the overclock.
 

Dpg3456

Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2016
It might be nice to run some stress test and install those programs before changing anything just to get a baseline and know what your performance was and then compare to what you changed. Not necessary but i find it helpful to compare.
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
With Gigabyte if you want to use Adaptive, it is called Dynamic DVID +0.075 for 4.5GHz. That is what I used in the past for i5 2500k.
 
OP
L

LaskoAA

Registered
Joined
Mar 24, 2017
With Gigabyte if you want to use Adaptive, it is called Dynamic DVID +0.075 for 4.5GHz. That is what I used in the past for i5 2500k.


Hi Wingman, I successfully overclocked at 4.2 mhz with a 1.300 voltage. I ran a 5 hour stress test with 0 errors. Right now I'm running at 4.2 mhz with World of Warcraft running and my temp is only 44 degrees so I'm going to try to push to 4.5 mhz this weekend.

With that said, where is the Dynamic DVID option? I'm not seeing that in my bios.

Thanks
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
Hi Wingman, I successfully overclocked at 4.2 mhz with a 1.300 voltage. I ran a 5 hour stress test with 0 errors. Right now I'm running at 4.2 mhz with World of Warcraft running and my temp is only 44 degrees so I'm going to try to push to 4.5 mhz this weekend.

With that said, where is the Dynamic DVID option? I'm not seeing that in my bios.

Thanks

Set the Vcore to Normal, then under the vcore is the Example +0.070 Dynamic/Adaptive. Unless yours only has Dynamic, does it only have this setting +0.000 for Vcore? GA-Z68AP-D3 page 39-41 in the owners manual.
 
Last edited:
OP
L

LaskoAA

Registered
Joined
Mar 24, 2017
Set the Vcore to Normal, then under the vcore is the Example +0.070 Dynamic/Adaptive. Unless yours only has Dynamic, does it only have this setting +0.000 for Vcore? GA-Z68AP-D3 page 39-41 in the owners manual.


I researched the motherboard and I don't believe there is an "adaptive" option available.

My current config is below: (I lowered the voltage to 2.3 mhz).

bios_current.jpg



Should I use this updated config below instead? (Also, if I'm only going to 4.2, should I still use +0.070, or lower that?)

bios_new.jpg


Thanks so much for your help!!


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Johan45

Benching Team Leader Super Moderator
Joined
Dec 19, 2012
Looks like, if you want the adaptive setting then DVIV is the one to use. Try setting it to - 0.065 and test for stability. You'll need to fine tune it yourself.
 
OP
L

LaskoAA

Registered
Joined
Mar 24, 2017
Looks like, if you want the adaptive setting then DVIV is the one to use. Try setting it to - 0.065 and test for stability. You'll need to fine tune it yourself.


Ok thanks, is running as adaptive worth it or should I just keep it as I have it now?

Also, with my current settings my CPU temperature doesn't seem to be breaking 40c degrees while gaming so it looks like I can push even further (of its worth it to do so).


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Johan45

Benching Team Leader Super Moderator
Joined
Dec 19, 2012
It never really hurts as long as you do it responsibly. I always tune my PC for it's optimum settings. Using the DVID will let the PC idle at lower speed/voltage as long as you have the C states and speedstep enabled. That's the only benefit of doing it that way
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
Ok thanks, is running as adaptive worth it or should I just keep it as I have it now?

Also, with my current settings my CPU temperature doesn't seem to be breaking 40c degrees while gaming so it looks like I can push even further (of its worth it to do so).


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If you want to run DVID from CPU Voltage core, just make sure what you set for DVID has the same maximum Vcore that you set with static Vcore that you see in windows using software utility. I use Dynamic DVID Vcore for less wear and tear. Example Prime 95 uses 1.332v and games and RealBench uses ~1.260v so DVID will adjust for what you are doing and idle.
 
OP
L

LaskoAA

Registered
Joined
Mar 24, 2017
It never really hurts as long as you do it responsibly. I always tune my PC for it's optimum settings. Using the DVID will let the PC idle at lower speed/voltage as long as you have the C states and speedstep enabled. That's the only benefit of doing it that way


How exactly do I calculate the DVID once I have found optimal overclock settings?



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- - - Updated - - -

If you want to run DVID from CPU Voltage core, just make sure what you set for DVID has the same maximum Vcore that you set with static Vcore that you see in windows using software utility. I use Dynamic DVID Vcore for less wear and tear. Example Prime 95 uses 1.332v and games and RealBench uses ~1.260v so DVID will adjust for what you are doing and idle.


How exactly do I calculate the DVID once I have found optimal overclock settings?



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||Console||

Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2004
I just use normal vcore settings and it lowers the voltages with speedstep?


Don't give up @4.2 those chips sometimes hit 5ghz

I would be aiming at 4.5-4.6 min if it was me
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
How exactly do I calculate the DVID once I have found optimal overclock settings?



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How exactly do I calculate the DVID once I have found optimal overclock settings?



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They way I do it is look at the voltage stock with the multiplier set to 4.2Ghz under stress testing. With that value then just add the DVID Vcore for what is needs when overclocking higher.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
They way I do it is look at the voltage stock with the multiplier set to 4.2Ghz under stress testing. With that value then just add the DVID Vcore for what is needs when overclocking higher.

This is also the approach I use. What you want to know is what it's pulling under load at stock to get a baseline.
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
This is also the approach I use. What you want to know is what it's pulling under load at stock to get a baseline.

I also need to add the Maximum turbo boost clock of 4.2GHz to the baseline, so turbo boost will up the voltage using stock Auto default voltage. The way it goes, OP processor is a i7 2700k, turbo is 3.9GHz so he could set the multiplier to 39, however I find when you go over that clock speed a little it will give you a solid voltage with all 4 cores, the OP could just test at 3.9GHz and that would be OK, however why not test at 4.1-4.2GHz.