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Integrated Network Adapter will not start on cold startup.

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RALPH50

Registered
Joined
May 29, 2017
Hey guys, I need your help.

I have been trying to fix this problem for 3 days now with no success.

Symptoms: On COLD STARTUP during BIOS POST initializing, network adapter will not turn on, no green light. After boot, device manager shows correct name of adapter Intel 82579V (FYI integrated) with yellow marking. The driver is loaded but has not started as indicated in the System information. If I reboot or disable the driver and then enable it, the network adapter will then turn on. Subsequent boots will keep the adapter working, but if I shutdown the PC completely and then restart, then the network adapter will be turned off. When I startup the PC with the power off (cold start S5 soft-off state), the network adapter will not start and when I check the adapter's properties-details-power data, the current power state will be D3, which means no power provided.

What I have tried:

1. Installed latest driver, resulted in same problem.

2. Installed the Intel NVRAM update to correct the chipset name of the adapter 82579V from 82579LM, resulted in same problem.

3. Installed a new CMOS battery, resulted in same problem.

4. Defaulted BIOS settings, resulted in same problem.

5. Jumped the BIOS pins and reset with full power cycle, resulted in same problem.

6. Jumped the Intel ME Engine pins and reset, resulted in same problem.

7. Basic checks: Reseated all cables. Checked the integrated adapter, no visual problems. Motherboard is less than 1 year old. Capacitors look fine.

8. Re-installed Windows, resulted in same problem.

9. Checked the network adapter WITHOUT Windows installed, resulted in same problem. Cold start, no power, but if you reboot from BIOS again, the adapter will turn on.

10. Tested with different Power Supply, resulted in same problem.

11. Oh yeh, unchecked all the power saving features under power management for network device, resulted in same problem.

12. Check BIOS LAN was enabled, resulted in same problem.

Now here's where I need your help. I already did all of the above. The key check that I made is that WITHOUT the Windows and drivers installed, the problem still occurs, adapter does not start on cold startup, but if you reboot with just the BIOS installed, the green light will come on indicating the adapter now has power. That would indicate a problem in the BIOS POST not starting the adapter from a soft-off state or a mechanical off state.

Note: A related problem that occurred at the same time that this network adapter issue occurred is that if I shutdown the PC and then I shut off the surge protector that the PC is connected to, or if I just remove the plug from the PC, then I cannot restart the PC with the power button switch. Even with the new CMOS battery in, if I go from no power (G3 Mechanical Off), to plugging back in and starting the PC, it will not turn on. If I remove the battery while the PC is still plugged in, it still will not start. It will only start if I disconnect the power (Mechanical Off) and then remove the battery and then plug back in, and then hit the power button, then the PC will start.

It seems like there is a conflict within the BIOS and motherboard. Anyone have any suggestions?

My Specs:

Windows 7 32bit
DH61CR Motherboard (integrated Network adapter 82579V)
I5-2500 CPU
No additional PCI cards
Corsair PSU VS650
All Drivers are up-to date.
All Windows Updates installed.
Latest BIOS installed.

Thanks in advance for your help. :)
 

Juggley

Registered
Joined
May 27, 2017
Try this driver out.https://downloadcenter.intel.com/do...k-Adapter-Driver-for-Windows-7-?product=47549

For some reason on your boards page where it list drivers. It only has one from 2014. I read a post online while researching your problem and someone said they installed these drivers dated 4/27/2017 that i linked above and it fixed their problem. Your NIC is listed in the supported devices on that page above. If that don't work i would reflash your bios. May have got a power surge that threw something out of whack if not permanent damage. Check your Cat cable as odd as that sounds also. Also what Trents said above. I'll keep on the look for more solutions though. Have a good one.
 
OP
RALPH50

RALPH50

Registered
Joined
May 29, 2017
Hey Juggley, thanks for the help, but yeh, you're right. On the Intel MB DH61CR page, it lists the current adapter driver as version 19.1 2014. Then on the actual Intel adapter 82579V page, it list the current driver as version 22.3 2017. I tried both already with no success. Also, I already reflashed the BIOS a few times already, even by jumping the pins, no change. I am pretty sure the clue is that the problem still exists even without Windows and drivers installed, as I tried it, uninstalled everything and started up the PC with the same problem, adapter with not start from a cold start, but if I reboot after going into the BIOS, then the adapter will start, and this is without the drivers or Windows installed. So I think it has to be a problem between the BIOS somehow not powering up the adapter. :(
 

Juggley

Registered
Joined
May 27, 2017
No probelm. That is a odd issue. I'm no expert by any means but i do enjoy a little brainstorming fun. Based on my research it seems many many people have had a very similar issue as you with that particular NIC. I'll keep digging for anything but maybe some who knows first hand of this issue may know.

I read something just then about a screw near the H61 chipset causing a strange short where it kept the NIC from powering on from a cold boot. But the post was very vague with no details. *shrug
 
OP
RALPH50

RALPH50

Registered
Joined
May 29, 2017
No probelm. That is a odd issue. I'm no expert by any means but i do enjoy a little brainstorming fun. Based on my research it seems many many people have had a very similar issue as you with that particular NIC. I'll keep digging for anything but maybe some who knows first hand of this issue may know.

I read something just then about a screw near the H61 chipset causing a strange short where it kept the NIC from powering on from a cold boot. But the post was very vague with no details. *shrug

And I appreciate your brainstorming too since I'm going on 5 days now without a fix. I also posted this issue on the Intel forums, but no one had any answers. That NIC shorting things sounds interesting. I'm willing to try anything.
 

Juggley

Registered
Joined
May 27, 2017
And I appreciate your brainstorming too since I'm going on 5 days now without a fix. I also posted this issue on the Intel forums, but no one had any answers. That NIC shorting things sounds interesting. I'm willing to try anything.

here's another idea. you probably already did this if your as OCD as me lol but unplug your pc from the power surge and directly into the wall. maybe power strip isn't doing something right. also did this just randomly pop up out of the blue? has there been any electrical storms around the time this started. Maybe check your standoffs on the motherboard and make sure nothing strange is going on there. Still brainstorming. it's fun sometimes.

Guess if it comes down to it, you could get a NIC card.

if I shutdown the PC and then I shut off the surge protector that the PC is connected to, or if I just remove the plug from the PC, then I cannot restart the PC with the power button switch. Even with the new CMOS battery in, if I go from no power (G3 Mechanical Off), to plugging back in and starting the PC, it will not turn on. If I remove the battery while the PC is still plugged in, it still will not start. It will only start if I disconnect the power (Mechanical Off) and then remove the battery and then plug back in, and then hit the power button, then the PC will start.

This part here is of concern and may very well be some sort of failure going on somewhere in the board. which really sucks. been down that road.
 
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trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Yeah, just get an add on NIC PCI or PCI-e. You can also get a USB to ethernet adapter. They aren't very expensive. The onboard NIC may be getting weak. Your hardware is getting old. And you actually are running a 32-bit version of Widnows 7? How much RAM do you have?
 

Janus67

Benching Team Leader
Joined
May 29, 2005
To test the shorting theory try powering the machine outside of the case, set the Mobo on a piece of cardboard or something similar and non-conductive

 

duceduc

New Member
Joined
May 30, 2017
I am having the same issue with OP, RALPH50. It's driving me nuts as I have tried several suggestions, but not as extensive as the OP has done. The issue has started from day one when I first bought my mobo using windows 7 and still persist using Windows 10. My temp fix was using a .bat script to have the nic disabled and enabled during startup. While that helped when I was on Windows 7, Windows 10 doesn't seem to work anymore. Perhaps the script needs to be tweaked. I would rather find a proper fix for this issue.

If I disabled hibernate, powercfg -h off, that is the same as disabling fast startup??

Mobo:
Asus P8Z77-V PRO
 
OP
RALPH50

RALPH50

Registered
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May 29, 2017
Juggley, I am OCD and I tried the direct plug in the wall thing on the first day because I thought it could be the surge protector, but it resulted in the same problem.

The standoffs is a possibility, but visually, the motherboard looks like it has good distance between the casing. Besides, I'm not in the mood to disassemble everything. I might save that check for last. :)

The reason also is that I don't think it's a shorting on startup. I believe it has something to do with the power down. I verified this by changing the BIOS setting to "On power Failure -Power On". Before, when the BIOS setting was set to "Stay Off" on a power failure, then that's exactly what it did. I could not restart after turning back on the surge protector. But now with the BIOS on "Power ON" setting, when I turn on the surge protector, the PC now automatically boots up. That would mean that for some reason, the BIOS recognizes all the (G3 mechanical) shutdowns as power failures. I tried this also by just turning off the power supply button in the back. Then I turned the power supply button back on and the PC started up as if it was a power failure. Idk, but those are my symptoms. Anyway, I need your help man, keep brainstorming.
 
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OP
RALPH50

RALPH50

Registered
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May 29, 2017
Trents, the hardware is not actually OLD in use. The motherboard model is old, but physically it is new. I bought it years ago brand new still sealed in the box, but never installed it until 6 months ago. Capacitors and everything else looks great. And it's Windows 7 32bit with 4gb ram. But again, the Windows has nothing to do with it, as I tested the problem WITHOUT Windows and drivers being installed.
 
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OP
RALPH50

RALPH50

Registered
Joined
May 29, 2017
duceduc, I tried the batch script, but I couldn't get it to work. It would only work if the network adapter was already on in the device manager. If it was not on in the device manager, then the script would do nothing. And I believe Hibernating has to do with the level of deep sleep that the PC can go into, and Fast Startup has to do with the BIOS Post settings. My Fast Boot is disabled and I still have the problem.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Have you checked to see if a newer bios is available and even if not, I would try reflashing the bios. Sleep/hibernation states when not in windows are controlled by the bios. The bios could be corrupt.
 

Juggley

Registered
Joined
May 27, 2017
Juggley, I am OCD and I tried the direct plug in the wall thing on the first day because I thought it could be the surge protector, but it resulted in the same problem.

The standoffs is a possibility, but visually, the motherboard looks like it has good distance between the casing. Besides, I'm not in the mood to disassemble everything. I might save that check for last. :)

The reason also is that I don't think it's a shorting on startup. I believe it has something to do with the power down. I verified this by changing the BIOS setting to "On power Failure -Power On". Before, when the BIOS setting was set to "Stay Off" on a power failure, then that's exactly what it did. I could not restart after turning back on the surge protector. But now with the BIOS on "Power ON" setting, when I turn on the surge protector, the PC now automatically boots up. That would mean that for some reason, the BIOS recognizes all the (G3 mechanical) shutdowns as power failures. I tried this also by just turning off the power supply button in the back. Then I turned the power supply button back on and the PC started up as if it was a power failure. Idk, but those are my symptoms. Anyway, I need your help man, keep brainstorming.

Sorry been away. Real life issues (Work and such). This is looking like a flaky bios like trents said with possible corruption going on. Either that or something else on the board is flaking out. I mean you have done a good job exhausting everything i can think of as far as troubleshooting in my opinion and the problem exists even with Windows out of the picture.

I had a similar issue with my bios getting corrupted in the past, along with other strange issues to what i think was due to dirty electricity in the area i live in. Luckily i was able to do a simple reflash to get everything back to normal. I had other issues with some other electronics in my area due to what i call dirty electricity. I don't know if that is the technical term (maybe someone can correct me here). hope i'm making sense. Anyway the point is, i now run a very nice power conditioners (Furman) on most of my expensive electronics because the power coming into my house is so dirty and spiky at times with no consistency. I rewired my whole house a few years ago and it did help but very little. my house wiring needed updated anyway as my house is 1950's era. This happens to my neighbors in my area too.

I'm still brainstorming though. little slow tonight though. Got alot of work related crap to deal with but i'll keep ya posted with my electronic conspiracy theories. hehe

Have you checked to see if a newer bios is available and even if not, I would try reflashing the bios. Sleep/hibernation states when not in windows are controlled by the bios. The bios could be corrupt.

He has already tried reflashing it a few times. But i like your idea about the Sleep/hibernation states.
 
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OP
RALPH50

RALPH50

Registered
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May 29, 2017
trents, yep, I installed latest BIOS 120, no change. I also reflashed a few times by way of removing the cmos battery and also by jumping the pins, no change. Technically, I don't see anything wrong with the performance of the BIOS. If I test it by disabling any feature, then the feature is disabled after boot. If I enable any feature, it's enabled and working correctly. I have even tried disabling/enabling (vice versa) all the BIOS WOL features e.g., deep S4/S5 sleep, Wake from USB, etc., no change.

But thanks again for your help.
 
OP
RALPH50

RALPH50

Registered
Joined
May 29, 2017
Hey Juggley, a BIOS corrupt?.... humm...Idk.... I just now did the CMOS battery reset and jumped the pins again. Everything in the BIOS seems to work fine.

And the dirty electricity, I agree 100%. I am originally from New York, but I'm working in the Philippines now. There are voltage spikes and recurring black-outs all over the electrical system here and most houses are not grounded internally. They do have a main ground at each house entrance/electrical post, but for some reason, no one runs ground lines from the entrance to each outlet. So all electrical equipment here has no ground. So I'm wondering if the no ground issue would cause the PC to see turning off the surge protector or turning off the button on the power supply as a Power Failure? The thing is that this powering off problem just started to occur at the same time as the network adapter problem. I also have another PC and have never had this power state problem.

Update: I just tried a direct power connection to a different outlet, same problem. I also just tested and connected the PC plug to a AVR voltage regulator that I had connected to another PC, same problem.

I'm kind of thinking that I'm never going to find the answer to this problem. What is also weird about it is that I have done 5 days of searching for the answer online and the problem seems to be wide spread across totally different PC systems, including laptops. All of the suggestions for the network adapter were the common ones like unchecking the power management options under the network card. But after reading all the posts from different websites about the same issue, none of the victims of the same problem ever tested the problem without Windows or drivers installed. They only reinstalled windows without first checking if the network device physically turns on with power. I did this check and as I mentioned before, from a no power state on startup, the adapter will be off without Windows installed, but then if I go into the BIOS and then update anything in the BIOS or if I just reboot from the current power "On" state, at that next restart, the adapter will be lit with the green light and receiving power. The adapter is only disabled on a cold startup with no power at all going to the PC. It seems like maybe it could be a power policy problem in the ACPI, but I have no idea how that works. I read a little bit about the ACPI interface and how it controls the power to devices when the BIOS initializes, but there's nothing on the internet explaining how to check the ACPI for problems. Some guy wrote an article that said that when you shutdown the PC, the ACPI puts the computer into a policy state of S5 (No power), but instead of shutting down, when you do a reboot, he said that the ACPI skips putting the PC in a power state and that the ACPI only resets the register that controls the devices, whatever that means.

Anyway dude, thanks for all your help, but I think it's time for me to give up on this one and just buy a new Network card. And I guess I'm going to have to live with this power problem until I get some type of fix for it. :(
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Ralph, removing the cmos battery or moving the jumper on the reset pins is not the same thing at all as reflashing the bios. That is a "reset". Reflashing involves reinstalling the bios version in use from the bios file downloaded from the board manufacturer. You unpack the archived file to a flash drive, insert the flash drive in a usb port and then boot into bios. There is a tool in the bios for reflashing or flashing with a different version. You seem to be confusing the terms resetting and flashing.
 
OP
RALPH50

RALPH50

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May 29, 2017
Ok trents, you got me on a silly clerical error.

Quote "trents, yep, I installed latest BIOS 120, no change." My mistake is that I then wrote "I also reflashed a few times by way of removing the cmos battery and also by jumping the pins, no change", meant to say resetted.

So to be perfectly clear, the problem first occurred with an active BIOS in use for 1 year now, version BIO 109. I then REFLASHED the BIOS with version BIO 116 (and yes trents, using a USB and watching that all the images installed correctly), as that version according to many users on the internet is the most stable version. I then verified through the BIOS that the new version was installed. I then tested the network adapter and power problem with the same negative results. I then reflashed again to the latest version BIO 120. All BIOS images were installed and the results were the same, no affect on the problem.

So now that we have gotten that out of the way, can you tell me what you know about the ACPI interface and how it could be affecting the network adapter and shutdowns?