GIGABYTE Launches Z77X-UP7 Overclocking Motherboard

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Coming just days after ASRock’s announcement, GIGABYTE has released their very own overclocking motherboard with all the bells and whistles. The Z77X-UP7 (like UD7 before it), was built for overclocking from the ground up. Though we will certainly be testing this board in the near future, it warrants an all-access preview to build suspense.

GIGABYTE Z77X-UP7

GIGABYTE Z77X-UP7

Features Overview

Power Delivery

The GIGABYTE Z77X-UP7 boasts the i7 3770k world record of 7.102 GHz, which means it must be suited for overcloking, right? In terms of sheer power, this board features the most robust power delivery system I have ever seen, a 32+3+2 phase design. This should allow for consistent and strong power delivery across the components, namely the CPU. The one downside looks like it might be challenging to insulate the socket area, but I guess all those phases have to go somewhere.

Test

32 Power Phase Design (Courtesy GIGABYTE)

The UP7 features Ultra Durable 5 technology, designed to give cool and efficient performance. This basically means GIGABYTE used high-quality components, but practically speaking a good example are the MOSFETS, which feature additional pins helping to keep them running at lower temperatures. Last but not least is the digital PWM design, which tends to come standard on high-end overclocking boards these days.

Onboard Overclocking Features

In addition to solid UEFI BIOS, users have the ability to flip a switch to toggle between BIOS. Failed flash? Bad settings? The BIOS switching feature will definitely be a time saver for many overclockers. Buttons on the PCB offers users the ability to adjust BCLK and CPU ratio in real-time while in BIOS, Windows or anything else. No reboot necessary. The board also has onboard voltage measurement areas and an LN2 mode, which drops the multiplier to 16x temporarily while getting benching applications set up.

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Onboard Overclocking Features (Courtesy GIGABYTE)

Wrapping Up

This board sounds like it could be a winner for those searching for the ultimate solution when it comes to overclocking, whether sub-zero, water cooling or even air. And if you have any money left over after purchasing the 3770k and the high-end board, grab four video cards because this board is capable of quad-SLI or CrossFireX at 8x (or single 16x direct link, bypassing the PLX chip, for optimal performance). We definitely looking forward to checking out the Z77X-UP7 and see how it compares directly to high-end ASUS and ASRock overclocking offerings.

For more information and photos visit: GIGABYTE Z77X-UP7 microsite

Stay tuned for our review of the board in a few weeks!

Matt Ring (mdcomp)

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Discussion
  1. Don't quote me on this, but I think the goal is to test this head to head against the MVE. We'll also probably throw in some comparison to the ASRock Formula board as well. Can't wait to see which one comes out on top.
    :attn:
    Looking forward to a heads up with the MVE...
    Asus has stated its not all about the number of phases... Gigabyte obviously feels different.
    Should be intresting!
    When should we expect the article?
    Gigabyte has always loved marketing phases. I'm curious how many actual phases this thing has. My guess is eight, split four times each. For the CPU, anyway.
    EDIT:
    Based on the pictures it looks like it might be six split six times each.
    Bobnova
    Gigabyte has always loved marketing phases. I'm curious how many actual phases this thing has. My guess is eight, split four times each. For the CPU, anyway.
    EDIT:
    Based on the pictures it looks like it might be six split six times each.

    LOL.. Yeah... I was watching a video on this thing somewhere the other day...
    In that video they stated it had the potential to deliver either 2000 or 4000 amps... I can't remember which they said... To the CPU.
    I just LOL'd... It would take WAYYYYY fewer than that to completely vaporize the CPU... and the board... and anything nearby.