Thermaltake New Soprano Mid-Tower Case Review

Way back in 2006, Thermaltake offered its first chassis in the Soprano line; the simple, but stylish Soprano VX. Thermaltake followed that up a couple of years later with the Soprano RS 101, which offered a new front panel design and more modern features. Fast forward to 2013 and we have another remake of the Soprano, called simply, “New Soprano”. The one thing I have always said about Thermaltake is that they seem to constantly strive to bring new and innovative products to the market. Let’s find out how they did with the New Soprano!

Specifications and Features

Here are the specifications associated with the New Soprano, as provided by Thermaltake.

New Soprano Specifications
Item NumberVO900M1N2N
Case TypeMid Tower
MaterialSECC
Front Bezel MaterialCombination of plastic and high air flow mesh
ColorInterior: Black
Exterior: Black
Side PanelSolid w/ Sound dampening foam
Motherboard Support9.6” x 9.6” (Micro ATX)
12” x 9.6” (ATX)
Motherboard TrayNo
5.25″ Drive Bay4
Ext. 3.5″ Drive Bay1
Int. 3.5″ Drive Bay5
Expansion Slots7
Front I/O PortsUSB 3.0 x 2
USB 2.0 x 2
MIC & Speaker (support AC’97 & HD Audio)
Cooling SystemFront (Intake) :
200 x 200 x 30 mm Blue LED fan x 1 (600~800rpm,13~15dBA)
Rear (Exhaust) :
120 x 120 x 25 mm TurboFan, 1000rpm, 16dBA
Bottom (Intake) :
120 x 120 x 25 mm x 1 (optional)
Liquid Cooling CapableYes
Liquid Cooling EmbeddedNo
Power Supply SupportedStandard ATX PSII Power Supply
Power Supply IncludedNo
Dimension (H*W*D)460 x 220 x 510 mm
18 x 8.7 x 20 inch
Net Weight8.3 kg
18.3lb
Security LockKensington lock port
ApplicationSuitable for gaming, enthusiast, DIY and modding
Warranty3 Years

The main features of the New Soprano include the following, which we’ll explore in greater detail further along in the review.

  • Aluminum front panel with elegant streamline design.
  • Sound-dampening foam for extreme silence.
  • USB 3.0 super speed support.
  • Top-mounted HDD hot swap docking station.
  • CableClear cable management design.
  • Innovative 5.25″ & 3.5″ tool-free drive mounting design.

Packaging

Black, with a splash of red, has become synonymous with Thermaltake packaging for a few years now. That same theme continues on here as well. Don’t fix it, if it ain’t broke!

The box front has an elegant image of the New Soprano along with the product motto of “Just Mute It”. The motto being an obvious reference to the sound dampening foam built into the case. The back of the box does an excellent job of providing the specifications and features, which are a repeat of what we listed above. The box sides don’t have a lot going on, other than another picture of the case and a multilingual features list.

Box - Front View
Box – Front View

Box - Right Side View
Box – Right Side View
tt_newsoprano (4)

Box - Back View
Box – Back View

Opening the box top reveals the standard Styrofoam shipping blocks we’ve all come to know and love. The case comes completely wrapped in plastic, and you’ll find the warranty information and users manual sitting on top.

Box Top Opened
Box Top Opened

Styrofoam Block and Plastic Wrap
Styrofoam Block and Plastic Wrap

Warranty Info and User Manual
Warranty Info and User Manual

Accessories

While the included accessory pack isn’t what I’d call “loaded”, there are plenty of screws to get everything installed correctly. They also include a speaker and a set of five “ball and socket” type wire ties.

Bag of Accessories
Bag of Accessories

Accessories Laid Out
Accessories Laid Out

Exterior Tour

The Soprano series of cases are intended to be of a classic and sleek design. To that end, the New Soprano carries that tradition forward. Both of the side panels are void of any windows, fan openings, or anything else for that matter. If you like a case free of “bling”, then here it is.

Left Side Panel
Left Side Panel

Right Side Panel
Right Side Panel

Taking a look at the rear of the New Soprano, we see the standard bottom mount PSU opening. Right above that are the seven ventilated expansion slot covers. Moving upward, we find the first of two included fans. This Thermaltake TurboFan is 120X25 mm in size and capable of running at a maximum speed of 1000 RPM @ 16dBA. Here, you will also find the opening for a motherboard’s I/O shield, three rubber protected holes for a water cooling system tubes, and lastly, a safety/security bracket for keyboard and mouse cables.

Case Rear
Case Rear

Bottom Mount PSU Opening
Bottom Mount PSU Opening

Seven PCI Expansion Slot Covers
Seven PCI Expansion Slot Covers

Top Most Rear of Case
Top Most Rear of Case

The front of the New Soprano features a brushed aluminum swing door that opens from the left side and swings to the right. As you can see by the first picture below, the entire front of the case has an ever-so-slight “S” shape to it. The door is held shut by two magnets located at the top and bottom. With the door opened, we expose four 5.25″ drive bays, one 3.5″ drive bay, and a dust filter covering the second included fan. The front intake fan is 200X30 mm in size, operates between 600~800RPM @ 16 dBA max, and has a blue LED. That doesn’t sound like a lot of RPMs; but being 200 mm in size, it does move a substantial amount of air. I’m not quite sure why they decided to use a fan with a LED lighting effect when there is no window, or anywhere else to see it from. Not to mention, there is also a door covering it.

Case Front
Case Front

Case Front - Door Open
Case Front – Door Open

Drive Bay Covers
Drive Bay Covers

Front Grill/Filter
Front Grill/Filter

Grill/Filter Opened
Grill/Filter Opened

Filter Up Close
Filter Up Close

Intake Fan Exposed
Intake Fan Exposed

The drive bay covers couldn’t be any easier to remove. You simply squeeze the two tabs inward to release and remove it. Yes, it’s really that simple!

Drive Bay Cover Removal
Drive Bay Cover Removal

3.5" Drive Bay Cover Removed
3.5″ Drive Bay Cover Removed

At the very top of the front panel is where you find two USB 3.0 and two USB 2.0 ports. The headphone and mic jacks are also located here. I like the way the descriptive emblem for each of these ports is actually located at the very top of the case. If you keep your case on the floor, or at least below the height of your head, you’ll appreciate this.

Also located at the top of the case are the power and reset buttons, and just to the left of those is the HDD activity LED. The power button features a blue LED ring around it that will illuminate when the system is powered on. The HDD activity LED is red in color. Something Thermaltake has begun to incorporate in almost every case they offer now days is an external HDD hot swap bay; and they’ve done it again here. The hot swap bay has a double door design, which will support 2.5″ or 3.5″ drives. You will want to make sure your motherboard supports the SATA hot swap feature. If you find it does not, that simply means you will have to turn the system off before installing a drive. The rest of the top panel is just flat and has no additional fan openings. Clean and “bling” free!

Front Panel/Top - I/O Connections
Front Panel/Top – I/O Connections

Power, Reset, HDD Activity
Power, Reset, HDD Activity

3.5" or 2.5" Hot Swap Bay
3.5″ or 2.5″ Hot Swap Bay

Drive Installed in Hot Swap Bay
Drive Installed in Hot Swap Bay

The Rest of the Bare Top Panel
The Rest of the Bare Top Panel

Our final stop along the exterior tour is the bottom area. There is a long filter that covers the optional 120 mm fan opening and the PSU’s intake. One of these days someone will design a filter like this that can be removed from the front of the case. Precious few have easy access to the back of their case, but almost everyone has unobstructed access to the front. There may be a case out there somewhere with a bottom filter that you can slide out the front, but I think it should be mainstream in this day and age.

The four feet have an attractive silver ring and are outfitted with rubber inserts. These rubber inserts help to prevent vibration and do a good job protecting the surface the case sits on.

One last thing to cover at the bottom of the case is an opening just below the front intake fan. While this is a great idea for providing an additional air passage to the front fan, there is one problem. It’s behind the front intake filter. Talk about the perfect opportunity to introduce a filter that can be slid out the front, this would surely be it.

The Soprano Bottom
The Soprano Bottom

Bottom Filter
Bottom Filter

Bottom Filter Removed
Bottom Filter Removed

Stylish Feet
Stylish Feet

Uncovered Air Passage
Uncovered Air Passage

Interior Tour

Before we explore the interior in more detail, here is a picture of what you see upon removing the left side panel for the first time. The last two pictures show the noise dampening material applied to both side panels. To keep as much cable management room behind the motherboard as possible, the material applied to the right side panel is much thinner than what is found on the left panel. Good decision!

Interior First Look
Interior – First Look

Noise Dampening Material - Left Panel
Noise Dampening Material – Left Panel

Noise Dampening Material - Right Panel
Noise Dampening Material – Right Panel

The bottom area is made up almost entirely of ventilation holes; and as mentioned before, you can install an additional 120 mm fan here. The PSU and optional fan area are covered by the bottom slide out filter we talked about earlier.

Moving up along the back of the case, we get an inside view of the PSU opening, the seven ventilated PCI expansion slot covers, and the 120 mm exhaust fan. Worthy of noting is a removable bracket that fits over the expansion slot covers. Because of the design, the thumb screws for mounting add on cards actually sit slightly outside of the case. The bracket covers the thumb screws, so they are not as visible or as easily accessible.

Bottom Area
Bottom Area

Thumb Screw Cover Removed
Thumb Screw Cover Removed

Then, under the top panel we have…. well, nothing really.

Inside of Top Panel
Inside of Top Panel

Moving over to the 5.25″ drive bay area, we can see the tool-less latches Thermaltake uses to secure optical drives. The latches work by raising the rear part of the latch as you slide a drive in. Once the drive has reached the proper position, the rear of the latch lowers back down and engages the two rear most mounting holes of the optical drive. You have the option of installing additional screws from the opposite side of the drive bay, if desired.

Just below the 5.25″ bays is the external 3.5″ drive bay for such things as a card reader, fan controller, etc. Right below the 3.5″ external drive bay is a HDD tray that is turned 90° from the other four below it. This tray will accept both 3.5″ and 2.5″ HDDs/SSDs. You might notice the picture of this tray shows the front end of it raised a bit. That’s because it’s a bit flimsy without a hard drive in it. However, once a drive is installed, the hold down latches in front of it will grasp much better.

The 3.5″ HDD cage has four slide out trays that also accept either 3.5″ or 2.5″ drives. Traditional 3.5″ HDDs will be able to take advantage of the rubber anti-vibration washers on each side of the tray. The trays are very easy to work with and are easily removable by squeezing the outer tabs and pulling straight out. None of the hard drive cages can be removed or rotated; they’re riveted in place.

5.25" Drive Bays
5.25″ Drive Bays

90° and External 3.5" Bays
90° and External 3.5″ Bays

3.5" HDD Trays
3.5″ HDD Trays

Easy to Work With!
Easy to Work With!

HDD Tray - Close Up
HDD Tray – Close Up

The motherboard tray has a very large hole for accessing a CPU cooler’s back plate. Given the size of the cut out, it should be plenty large for just about any cooler or motherboard configuration. All of the motherboard mounting holes are marked to coincide with the form factor being installed. The mounting legs themselves are pre-installed for an ATX form factor motherboard.

There are four rubber protected cable management holes. The three at the right side of the motherboard tray are in a vertical position, and the fourth is at the bottom right of the motherboard tray in a horizontal position. There is more than ample room to route cables through these holes, even for a system with many components.

As far as video card length is concerned, I measured right at 12 inches of available space.

CPU Cooler Access Hole
CPU Cooler Access Hole

Mounting Hole Markings
Mounting Hole Markings

Cable Management
Cable Management

More Cable Management
More Cable Management

Video Card Space
Video Card Space

The case wiring is pretty standard fare for a case in this class. The two included fans have 3-pin power connectors, and the wires are nicely sleeved. The front Panel USB 3.0 cable is intended for use with a motherboard with a USB 3.0 header. The SATA cable and power connector for the hot swap bay can be seen in the pictures below. I’d much prefer to see a SATA power connector rather than the Molex one used here. It can be frustrating when you have to run a single Molex cable from your PSU just for the hot swap bay. Especially, if you already have SATA power close by powering an optical drive. The rest of the case wiring is stuff you have seen many times over.

Both Fan Cables
Both Fan Cables

USB 3.0 and SATA Hot Swap Cable
USB 3.0 and SATA Hot Swap Cable

SATA Hot Swap Power
SATA Hot Swap Power

Front Panel - LED and Button Wires
Front Panel – LED and Button Wires

Front Panel - HD Audio and USB 2.0
Front Panel – HD Audio and USB 2.0

Forging ahead, we come to the front section of the case. Removing the front panel is quite easy and only entails grasping under the bottom and pulling it straight off. Once the front panel is off, we get an even better look at the massive 200 mm intake fan and an opportunity to look down the barrel of the drive bays.

Front Panel Removed
Front Panel Removed

Another 200 mm Intake Fan View
Another 200 mm Intake Fan View

Drive Bays
Drive Bays

Another little oddity I noticed while I had the front panel off is that you won’t be able to slide that 90° 3.5″ drive bay out the front. As you can see by the picture below, the 200 mm fan is in the way of sliding the tray out. However, I did find that if you pinch those two arms together far enough, you can slide it out towards the inside of the case. It’s a bit clumsy doing it this way; but if you don’t feel like removing the front fan in order to get the tray out, it’s an option.

A Little Clearance Problem
A Little Clearance Problem

The two pictures below give you a look at the circuitry employed by the front panel I/O and SATA hot swap bay.

Hot Swap Circuitry
SATA Hot Swap Circuitry

Front Panel I/O Circuitry
Front Panel I/O Circuitry

We’ll conclude our internal tour of the New Soprano by having a look at the right side and behind the motherboard tray. One of the first things I noticed was the large amount of room allocated behind the 3.5″ HDD cage. There won’t be any problems with the HDD end of your SATA cables getting too close to the side panel, that’s for sure. The other thing you don’t see very often is a design like this for routing the CPU AUX power cable. There are actually two of these holes tucked under the top panel. I really like the way this design allows the cable to lay flat against the back of the motherboard tray. The reason this happens is because the bend in the cable happens after it enters the main body, and not before, like traditional holes that are cut into the face of the motherboard tray.

As far as the room available between the back of the motherboard tray and the side panel, I measure it to be right at 7/8″. Well done!

Right Side Panel Removed
Right Side Panel Removed

3.5" HDD Cage Cable Space
3.5″ HDD Cage Cable Space

CPU AUX Power Cable Holes
CPU AUX Power Cable Holes

Motherboard Tray to Side Panel Distance
Motherboard Tray to Side Panel Distance

Putting It All Together

Other than perhaps using a water cooling system that is external of the case, the New Soprano isn’t very water cooling friendly. It’s not intended to be. Having said that, I’ll be installing an air cooled AMD FM2 build this time around.

System Components

The CD Rom drive was first to be installed, which took literally seconds to complete. Just slide it in through the front until you hear the definitive “click”….. Done! Next was the two HDDs listed above. I put the Western Digital 3.5″ HDD in the lower cage, but decided to use that 90° offset bay for the SSD. I also tossed a Sony card reader in the external 3.5” bay just for good measure.

CD Rom Installed
CD Rom Installed

Card Reader in Place
Card Reader in Place

3.5" HDD in Tray
3.5″ HDD in Tray

SSD in Tray
SSD in Tray

HDD Installed
HDD Installed

SSD Installed
SSD Installed

After all the drives were installed, I went to work on wiring everything up. Once that was complete, I had quite a bundle of wires behind the motherboard tray. Luckily, there is abundant room back there and the side panel easily went back on…. whew!

Where the Sparrows Hang Out
Where the Sparrows Hang Out

Right Side Panel Back On
Right Side Panel Back On

This case is super easy to build a system in. It seemed like every time I needed to do some cable management, there was a perfectly located place to do it. As I mentioned earlier, the PCI expansion slot thumb screws are actually located outside of the case, which makes installing add on cards that much easier.

As a testament to the noise dampening material applied to the side panels, I can tell you they work rather well. With the system totally buttoned up, it made very little noise. I had all the fans being controlled by the motherboard; and while the system was idle, I could barely hear anything at all. When I loaded things up to make the fan speed increase, the system still maintained a very comfortable noise level. Nothing to complain about here.

Here are the pictures of the completed build, enjoy!

The Build -Full View
The Build -Full View

The Build - Right Side
The Build – Right Side

Upper Section
Upper Section

The Build - Left Side
The Build – Left Side

The Build - Back View
The Build – Back View

The Build - Front View
The Build – Front View

With both side panels on, and the case all buttoned up, there isn’t a whole lot to view as far as lighting goes. If you swing the door open and remove the left side panel, you can enjoy some lighting effects. Here’s a couple of pictures taken in the dark to illustrate. I searched my stash pile of fans for one that had a blue LED, but all I had was a red one. So, that’s what we’ll use!

Front 200 mm Fan Lit Up
Front 200 mm Fan Lit Up

Front View Lit Up
Front View Lit Up

Conclusion

Currently, the New Soprano is priced at $119.99 at Newegg. That’s actually right where I expected it to be. This case is intended to target those who like clean lines and classic looks, all the while operating at a low noise level. There are several great features Thermaltake built into this chassis, such as a brushed aluminum front door, the built-in hot swap bay, and a huge amount of cable management options. I think this case does a nice job of blending just the right amount of enthusiast features with a more classic and simplistic look and feel. The build quality is fantastic, and the ease of assembling a system in the New Soprano just adds to the appeal. In my opinion, the New Soprano is a nice step forward for the Soprano series of Thermaltake cases.

Overclockers_clear_approved Click the stamp for an explanation of what this means

Dino DeCesari (Lvcoyote)

Discussion

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  1. man cant believe they brought back that old case, and they did a good job of it too :) last one i seen was one of the old silver ones back when amd athlon 64's were bossin :p but it is indeed puuurdy
    Just bought and moved my system over to one of these about a month ago, agree 100% with this review, great case. My last case was a cheap Azza case, and this was a huge step up for me in design and quality. The hotswap bay on top is a great feature :-) love it!