Cooler Master CM690 II Advanced Review

Cooler Master has been in business for more than a decade. They were “founded with the mission of providing the industry’s best thermal solutions.”  The Cooler Master CM690 II Advanced that we’ll be looking at today, which is a significant update to the venerable CM690, a budget champion for wire management with superb airflow, aims to push them further toward that mission.

Packaging and Specifications

The box arrived as it would when purchasing it from a store with no additional box or padding around the case’s own box. As you can see, it didn’t need any and survived the trip through UPS’s system quite nicely. The box is strong and the styrofoam floating the unit inside is ample to protect it in transit.

On the back of the box are some photographs and descriptions of various aspects of the case. The side lists the specifications, which are listed at Cooler Master’s site as well. The features outlined on their site are:

  • Oversized front and top mesh design for superb ventilation.
  • Accommodates 120 x 240 mm radiator inside the top or bottom.
  • Dust-control filters for all meshed areas.
  • Air cooling support for up to 10 fans (with support for up to 5 x 140mm fans).
  • External SATA X-dock .
  • Front blue LED fan on/off switch.
  • Rear retaining holes for water cooling kit.
  • Includes 1.8″ & 2.5″ HHD and SSD adapter.
  • Cable management and CPU retaining hole for easy maintenance.
  • Includes VGA card bracket (supports triple GPU card).

Box Front

Box Front

Box Rear

Box Rear

Box Side

Box Side

Box Opened

Box Opened

Out of the Box

Out of the Box

An External Tour

Removing the packaging material we’re met with a very nice, if slightly understated case. The lines are smooth and elegant. Starting with the top of the case, you can see the mesh over two fan locations to the left and the external HDD bay cover (Advanced version only), external I/O and power/reset switches to the right. There is a third switch to the left that turns the LEDs of the front fan on and off, which is a nice touch.

Top Panel

Top Panel

I/O, Switches & HDD Bay With Cover

I/O, Switches & HDD Bay With Cover

I/O, Switches & HDD Bay Uncovered

I/O, Switches & HDD Bay Uncovered

Moving around the rest of the case, both of the side panels are an unassuming semi-gloss black. When handling them, it’s very obvious they are stronger, heavier and better built than the original CM690. The semi-gloss paint on the entire case is solid and can take some minor (non-sharp-object) blows without issue.

The left (when looking at the front of the case) side panel can accommodate two 80mm, 120mm or 140mm fans. The right side panel (behind the motherboard tray) contains a mount for a small 80mm x 15mm fan to help cool the rear of a motherboard’s CPU socket.

"Front" Side Panel

Left Side Panel

"Rear" Side Panel

Right Side Panel

The front of the case has mesh with relatively large holes to allow greater air flow. In fact, everywhere there is mesh throughout the case, it has been enlarged from its predecessor’s design – a huge boon to better air flow. The blanks that fill in the 5 1/4″ bays help keep a nice, uniform look.

The rear of the case is pretty typical fare with a 120mm exhaust fan, bottom-mounted PSU slot, I/O & PCI-e/PCI slots. Painting the PCI blanks is a very nice touch and did not go unnoticed.

There are also two holes to accommodate water tubing. These are thankfully enlarged over the previous generation, easily fitting 5/8″ OD (outer diameter) tubing. There was no 3/4″ OD tubing here to test, but as loosely fitting as the 5/8″ was, 3/4″ should fit without issue.  The previous generation had difficulty even fitting 5/8″ through the grommets.

Case Front

Case Front

Case Rear

Case Rear

Inside the Case

When you first open the case, you see the box of accessories, which contains the standoffs, screws, a filter to place under the PSU intake fan and an interesting GPU bracket. After removing the accessories box, you can see the inside of a well painted case. The finish throughout is the same texture and color as the side panels. Again, the paint feels very solid and shouldn’t easily scratch or chip with normal use (provided your normal isn’t ham-fisted).

Inside with Accessory Box

Inside with Accessory Box

Accessory Box Removed

Accessory Box Removed

There are three fans included, one 120mm on the rear, one 140mm on the top and a 140mm with blue LEDs in the front. The front fan can be left as-is or moved down to another configuration. Whichever will suit your cooling needs better; a nice addition for versatility. While there are six HDD bays, the fan can basically reach four of them. Take your pick of whether it will cover the top or bottom drives.

Top and Rear Fan

Top and Rear Fan

Front Without Cover

Front Without Cover

There is a convenient CPU retaining hole designed to be behind the CPU socket for easy heatsink mounting. Unfortunately the design may not necessarily work for all motherboards, but more on that later.

Taking another look at the top fan configuration, there are spots for two fans, either 120mm or 140mm. It’s nice to see there is no additional, unnecessary mesh here either. The only mesh restricting airflow (and not very much because of its improved spacing) is the external cosmetic mesh.

There is room between the top cover panel and the top of the case to fit 25mm thick fans. 38mm thick fans don’t allow the panel to snap on, so there is a small limitation there. Cooler Master designed this part of the case to fit a 2x120mm radiator. Placing two fans on top and a (thinner) radiator underneath is a great way to have internal water cooling in a mid-tower case. It’s a rarity to have a mid-tower designed for an all internal water solution, so kudos to Cooler Master for making that happen.

Top From Underneath

Top From Underneath

Top Without Panel

Top Without Panel

Top Closer

Top Closer

But wait water cooling fanatics, there’s more!  In a nice piece of engineering, the bottom rack of four HDDs is removable, leaving two HDD brackets. This allows two 120mm fans to be mounted on the bottom of the case, with (or without) a radiator.

Bottom With HDD Rack Removed

Bottom With HDD Rack Removed

HDD Rack Removed

HDD Rack Removed

The HDD mounting brackets feel a lot stronger than the original CM690. The bracket, which holds the HDD on metal rods mounted in rubber grommets, slides smoothly into the rack. It snaps into place with a swinging arm that grabs the right side and latches with the left. Click on the first photo below and click “next” two times to see it in action.

Bracket In Action One

Bracket In Action One

Bracket in Action Two

Bracket In Action Two

Bracket Latched

Bracket Latched

Moving up a little bit, the four 5 1/4″ bays have received a new tool-free system with a simple “lock” or “open”, switch-style latch. These are surprisingly strong and easily hold an ODD without the need for a screw on the other side, (which felt necessary on the original). A screw certainly won’t hurt smaller devices with only one mounting hole (i.e. a fan controller), but you could probably get away without one if you choose.

The case does come with an adapter (not pictured) to convert one of the 5 1/4″ bays into a 3 1/2″ bay for a floppy drive / card reader / etc.

5 1/4" Bay Mounts

5 1/4" Bay Mounts

Turning the case around, there are plentiful wire tie mounts. This is a very welcome addition for wire management freaks like yours truly. They are in all the right places to keep your extra wires hidden from view. There are plenty of openings through the tray to thread the ends through so they come out exactly where you want them, but not so much that it’s difficult to hide wires.

The space between the tray and back panel feels deeper, if ever so slightly, than the original. This is also a welcome change. It takes significantly less effort to put the side panel on with well-hidden, thick wires.

Behind the MB Tray

Behind the MB Tray

On the bottom of the case there are tall and thick rubber feet on the rear of the case and equally tall plastic feet on the front with rubber bottoms. As mentioned before, there are two fan mounts for 120mm fans on the front and middle of the case (that can also work with a 120.2 radiator) as well as mesh for the PSU fan to draw air through the bottom of the case.

Like the rest of the grilles, this mesh is expanded for less restriction. There is a dust filter pre-installed on the front two fan grilles (seen below) and an extra supplied for you to install on the PSU grille (not pictured).

Case Bottom and Feet

Case Bottom and Feet

Dust Filter

Dust Filter

There is also a GPU bracket included with the case that we did not use as it wasn’t necessary. It’s a good design though and will treat those of you with multiple card or with a heavier multi-GPU in one card setup well. It can accommodate an 80mm x 15mm fan to assist in drawing cool air toward your GPU.

GPU Bracket

GPU Bracket Front

GPU Bracket Rear

GPU Bracket Rear

Installation

Before getting started, a huge thanks goes to CrazyPC.com for supplying a Swiftech MCR-220 to explore the internal water cooling options.

This case is a joy to work with. The wire management system is extremely well thought out. The holes are in the right places to aim your wires where you need them with minimal exposure and the metal is in the right places to hide them. There are wire-tie mounts galore, also in all the right places. Wire management with this case is a breeze.

Let’s go over what’s installed before getting to the pictures. The system consists of:

  • CPU: Intel i7 860
  • MB: EVGA P55 FTW
  • RAM: G.Skill Trident DDR3-2000
  • GPU: HIS HD4890 Turbo
  • HDDs: Four Western Digital drives of various sizes
  • PSU: Corsair TX650 (Remember when looking at the photos,  this unit is not modular.)

The water cooling loop consists of:

  • Pump: Swiftech MCP-355 with an XSPC Reservoir Top.
  • Radiator 1: Swiftech MCR-220, mounted up top with two high speed Yate Loon fans.
  • Radiator 2: Swiftech MCR-320, mounted externally via 6″ 6-32 threaded rods with three Ultra High Speed Panaflo fans and 38mm shrouds.
  • CPU Block: Swiftech Apogee XT
  • Tubing: Primochill Pro LRT 7/16″ ID / 5/8″ OD

The Yate Loon fans on the MCR-220 are mounted above the case frame in between it and the top cover drawing cool outside air into the case and pushing it through the radiator. The rear exhaust fan is the Cooler Master supplied 120mm fan and the side panel (not photographed) received the 140mm fan that was originally mounted on top of the case for use as an extra exhaust fan.

In order to mount the MCP-355 and because there weren’t going to be any fans down there, the bottom air filter was removed. Note that you will need some extra washers to mount something through the enlarged mesh on the bottom of the case. The bolt is 3/4″ 6-32 with a a #6 and a #10 washer to keep it from pulling through.

Enough talk though, let’s look at how it turned out, shall we? We’ll start with the back of the motherboard tray/HDD bays to see how the wires were actually run.

Wire Management Fun

Wire Management Fun

As you can see, the wire tie mounts are in all the right places to tame this non-modular Medusa of a power supply. Four of the six HDD bays are filled starting at the top, one under another. This left two HDD bays unused for some extra hiding space. All told, we went through the greater part of a 100-pack of 4″ wire ties.

One negative that was touched on earlier is the rear access hole for use in heatsink installation. Having the hole just a little bit bigger would have been perfect. Unfortunately, it doesn’t fit the bill with this EVGA P55 board. You have to either mount the heatsink (or waterblock) before putting the board in or remove / loosen enough mounting screws (meaning pretty much all of them, one way or the other) so that you can maneuver the board out far enough to get the HS mounting plate in there. This is one of the few drawbacks to this otherwise superb case.

Now we’ll look at the fun photos and see how that mess in the back turns out in the front!

Installed in its Entirety

Completed One

Completed Two

Completed Two

A Little Closer

A Little Closer

Top-Mounted Rad and Water Block

Top-Mounted Rad and Water Block

Upshot from Left

Upshot from Left

Upshot from Right

Upshot from Right

There you have it, installed and wire-managed. As you can see, the control you have over the wires translates very well to an extremely clean interior. Not only does this look a lot better, but it allows for great air flow inside the case to keep all of your components nice and cool.

Final Thoughts and Conclusion

Let’s not beat around the bush and get straight to the nitty-gritty!

Pros

  • Black painted interior.
  • Excellent fan grille mesh design allowing for better air flow.
  • No extra layer of mesh where the fans underneath the cosmetic covers mount to the case frame (this was an issue with the original CM690).
  • Strong, quality paint job.
  • Stout tool-free 5 1/4″ bay mounts.
  • Sturdy HDD trays with rubber mounts to dampen vibration.
  • One 2.5″ adapter for SSD mounting included.
  • Thicker, stronger side panels (than the original CM690).
  • External SATA HDD mount.
  • Improved I/O and switch placement.
  • Interior mounting for two 120.2 radiators (assuming they aren’t very thick and that you use only two HDDs.)
  • Larger grommets allowing for easy passage of thick water tubing.

Cons

  • CPU retaining hole isn’t large enough to accommodate common socket placement.
  • No grommets where the wires go through the motherboard tray (a la the Corsair 800D)
  • No side panel window.
  • A couple extra fans would be nice.

While we wish this case had a side panel to show off the glorious wire management that can be had, that’s not that big of a deal. A bigger deal is a heatsink mounting hole that isn’t big enough to use. While having to loosen the motherboard is a whole lot better than having to remove it outright, it’s still inconvenient to mess with. If it were ever so slightly larger, this issue would be moot.

All in all, this case is beautiful to behold and very easy to work with. Installation is a breeze and if you’re into wire management, it is most definitely your friend. There are also very few mid-tower cases designed specifically with water cooling in mind. It’s a breath of fresh air to be able to put two radiators in a case without needing to step up to a full tower behemoth.

Overall, we’re extremely impressed with Cooler Master’s latest offering. We could be happier, but only just – and for very minor reasons. If you’re in the market for a new case, at a mere $79.99 for the CM690 II Basic and $99.99 for the CM690II Advanced, this case is worth every penny!

-hokiealumnus

This review was cross-posted with Overclockers Tech.

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49 Comments:

Jolly-Swagman's Avatar
Very good Review hokiealumnus, nicely done and informative!
hokiealumnus's Avatar
Thank you very much!

If anyone has any questions about the case that I didn't cover, I'm happy to answer them. Ask away!
EarthDog's Avatar
This is a great review hokie...wow!!!!!!!
Owenator's Avatar
Great article!

I've been admiring this case from afar for quite some time. Pulled the trigger today. I plan on building it wiht two swiftech 220 radiators one on top and the new pump attached one in the bottom. I'll have a "Y" line for filling going up top. My initial plan is to just have two 140mm fans in the top space with the bottom rad without fans entirely. I'll post up once I've done the build with some pics.

I'm looking forward to a quieter and smaller foot print system to my current Thermatake Armor beast. I'm also going to see about switching/modding the 2/4 drive bracket to 4/2 layout and removing only the bottom two if possible. We'll see.
hokiealumnus's Avatar
Thanks!

That's a brilliant idea for all internal water. Don't forget to take note of their installation orientation requirements (looks like you have already).

Show us pics when you're done!
Owenator's Avatar
Thanks for the kind words!

Yep, I saw the orientation guide. I'm going for the (*2) - horizontal & flat face up. My first thought is to have the reservoir end by the front of the case to potenially use for draining as the lowest point. I'll see how it all fits when the parts come in later this week.
gcwebbyuk's Avatar
I will be interested to see how this build goes
Owenator's Avatar
Gee why? I liked your write up too. It also convinced me to get this case.

I got the rad, fan and fillport I ordered today but the case was shipped separately. I hope to have it soon then I can start building!

EDIT: The seller let me down. They didn't really have the case in stock like they claimed. Instead they had one drop shipped to me from Coolermaster. Apparently Coolermaster shipped it UPS GROUND! I won't get it until Monday. Ticks me off because I payed them for three day shipping when I ordered it on Monday. They should have done the stand up thing and told me they had to do this but they didn't and now there is no hope of me having any updates until next week.
hokiealumnus's Avatar
Ok, this is just so freaking cool. Got a W/D HDD back from RMA. Didn't feel like opening the case...so I popped that sucker into the external HDD tray, restarted and bam - new HDD.

It's far from a permanent solution of course, but to test a new HDD it's far easier than having to install it and less of a pain than dealing with eSATA.

So another great benefit to the CM690 II Advanced. I just touched on it in the review, but it's much cooler than I considered it at the time. Yay!

EDIT - I just noticed your edit Owenator. I'd be ripping someone a new one until they refunded that extra money you paid for shipping. Regardless if they told you or knew they had to do it, they darn well shouldn't take your money for shipping they can't provide.
gcwebbyuk's Avatar
I have used it a LOT.

For instance this week: backing up a faulty laptop when the laptop wouldnt boot - removed, put in X-dock - backed up using Acronis - new drive in X-dock - restored to new drive, put back in laptop - sorted.

It's just so easy and convenient.
Owenator's Avatar
Cool! That was a big selling point for me too.

Well, because I have more money than patience I actually bought another 690II from Newegg that's coming today. Woot!

I'll have to decide when I get the new one if I'll return it or keep it as a spare. I'm leaning toward the spare idea.
hokiealumnus's Avatar
Hahaha...I wish I shared that problem!
updawg's Avatar
What are the differences between the advanced and basic model?
hokiealumnus's Avatar
Per CM web site -

Advanced features:
  • Oversized front and top mesh design for superb ventilation.
  • Accommodates 120 x 240 mm radiator inside the top or bottom.
  • Dust-control filters for all meshed areas.
  • Air cooling support for up to 10 fans (with support for up to 5 x 140mm fans).
  • External SATA X-dock .
  • Front blue LED fan on/off switch.
  • Rear retaining holes for water cooling kit.
  • Includes 1.8" & 2.5" HHD and SSD adapter.
  • Cable management and CPU retaining hole for easy maintenance.
  • Includes VGA card bracket (supports triple GPU card).

Basic Features:
  • Oversized front and top mesh design for superb ventilation.
  • Accommodates 120 x 240 mm radiator inside the top or bottom.
  • Dust-control filters for all meshed areas.
  • Air cooling support for up to 10 fans (with support for up to 5 x 140mm fans).
  • Front blue LED fan on/off switch.
  • Rear retaining holes for water cooling kit.
  • Cable management and CPU retaining hole for easy maintenance.
gcwebbyuk's Avatar
Still not sure if I am going to keep my case as an air setup or go WC....

I have 2 scythe quietdrives now for my seagate 3.5" drives mounted in the 5.25" bays.

The fans I am using are pretty much silent, and am currently running stock speeds - but as the case is so well designed for watercooling it keeps making me go back and want to do it!

Just need to put some cash to one side to spend on it, although next purchase is an SSD....
hokiealumnus's Avatar
Water is a lot of fun! If you have any questions, our water cooling section has a bunch of knowledgeable people that'll jump right to your aid. Hope to see you on the dark side sometime.
gcwebbyuk's Avatar
Thanks mate - I already have a long thread on there trying to weigh up the pros/cons of watercooling for silence (in fact you have helped with a few questions on there ). At the mo it's such a big investment to make, as I know I will get addicted and keep spending! I have bought about as much as I can with regard to air though, so it is the next step.... SSD first, then WC a little later in the year I think, especially as I now have PC under the desk so it's not right next to my ears
Owenator's Avatar
My watercooled CM690 II:


That's one MCR220 and a MCR220 Drive in series.
hokiealumnus's Avatar
Awesome job Owenator!! That looks great.

BTW, I think you forgot to plug your motherboard back in.
gcwebbyuk's Avatar
Nice

What sort of temps do you get?

I was considering two MCR220s with a 655 pump, Apogee GTZ and a water block too.

At present, my silent air setup with stock CPU settings is getting a range of between 25c to 56c running OCCT PSU test. With fans on full, I get between 25c-50c.


Only change to the above pic is that I have moved the S-Flex E from the bottom of the case as an intake, and mounted at the top/back of the case as an exhaust.
gcwebbyuk's Avatar
With my modified Zalman cooler (2x Scythe 92mm gentle typhoons) - glad I have the VGA retention bracket to keep it supported!



I am getting GPU temps in OCCT PSU test of between 16c and 45c and with both fans on full - 13c to 31c! Thats with the card running at GPU-780MHz RAM-1090MHz!
Owenator's Avatar
Yeah it's not all juiced back up in that shot. I also removed the Thermaltake fans and just used two 140mm in the bottom of the case wiht no fans in the top.

Here it is all filled and running.
hokiealumnus's Avatar
You don't have any fans on the rad up top?
gcwebbyuk's Avatar
Yeah I thought it looked quite slim up there - so is it just 4 fans in the whole system?
Owenator's Avatar
You're both right - no fans on top. I was planning on the 140's up there but they don't fit. The existing 120's I have are too loud so I was running no top fans until I get quieter alternatives. I was thinking of using the rear 120mm from this case and then scavenging a second from the second CM690 II I have coming today. I am debating on a homemade window in the side also.

I've decided to keep the second CM690 II as I seem to always need spare mid size cases. Not sure what I'll do with the old Thermaltake Armor beast. Maybe a server?
gcwebbyuk's Avatar
What sort of temps are you getting? Do you reckon the loop would handle one of your graphics cards too?
hokiealumnus's Avatar
Slim is fine - you can put 25mm fans in between the top panel & the case itself, so the only thing taking up space inside is the radiator.
Ahh, gotcha. Just glad you're not leaving it fanless.

Do you have a boat? It might make a good anchor.
Owenator's Avatar
I haven't started temp monitoring yet but now that it's fully bled I will. I really did this rebuild to get quiet more than cooler.
gcwebbyuk's Avatar
Thats what I would be aiming for too. I use PC a lot at night and it's in our bedroom, so silence is priority.

Am adding 3 more S-Flex Es to the case, two on the bottom as intake and another up top as an exhaust. They will all be set to run at 660rpm so they won't be heard. I can then use them for the rads if I do go watercooled.

One change I have made to the case is to block off the two 140mm side vents, currently with just some sound deadening material as is sticks nicely, but looking for a better alternative. Blocking these off has made no negative change to the temps so am happy with that.

I also cut away the rear honeycomb style fan shroud on the rear of the case with a dremel to cut down on air turbulence:
gcwebbyuk's Avatar
Are there any side panels with windows cut in available for this case in the uk yet?
hokiealumnus's Avatar
There aren't any available in the US, at least from Newegg. They have none listed on their site either. if you want one, looks like you have to make your own.
Owenator's Avatar
I saw the one at the CM site but I have no problem making my own. After I move/add the 120mm fans, I'll try by blocking off the side vents to force the airflow up and out like gcwebbyuk did. That should help my setup. MI don't think I need the rear fan either as my two GTX260's move a lof of air out of the case.
gcwebbyuk's Avatar
I am just thinking, if I go down the route of watercooling, then a side window to show it off would look good. I may consider getting one made for me, maybe even with tinted perspex/acrylic so it still has the stealthy look. I think if I don't go full watercooled then I may get an H50 or try a CM V10...

Just got an email from CM saying they are soon to have the side window available in the uk, but no date as of yet.
Owenator's Avatar
In the US Tiger Direct has them listed as RA-692-KWN1.
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applicati...ey=RA-692-KWN1
hokiealumnus's Avatar
Ooo...that's sweet, and they're only $20. Nice find!
baneonrt's Avatar
Here's a picture of mine with the side window. Gives you a better idea than the tiger direct product page.



Steve
Owenator's Avatar
Nice! Is that a 120mm of 140mm fan in the window?
baneonrt's Avatar
120mm. Don't remember which brand...Hyper something. Too loud at 12v so I run it at 7.

Steve
Owenator's Avatar
Thanks! I was wondering how big that opening was in the clear "grill" part. I am trying to reduce my fan count or use as big of fans as possible.
baneonrt's Avatar
That side fan dropped my hot MSI chipset temps by over 10C. Hovers around 60C now. When I first installed it on first bootup the bios reported it at upper 80's C. Then I changed the thermal compound and it dropped to around 70C-73C without that fan.


Steve
Owenator's Avatar
Ahh! My chipset is watercooled. I'm composing an article that will have a better shot of it.

I moved the 120mm from the back, relocated it to my upper rad pulling air out and added a second 120mm. Load on 8 cores before was approaching 60C with Prime95 running on all cores. Now it's just a smidge less at 59C. Still very quet though. Nothing like the ThermalTake tornado.
baneonrt's Avatar
I'm hoping to do a full water cooling setup in this case very soon. I want to keep this 930 running at at least 4.2GHz throughout the summer. So far it's been stable but who knows once temps rise another 30F.

Steve
PhysX's Avatar
looksl ike my next purchase
hokiealumnus's Avatar
Not bad at all gcwebbyuk.

A wise purchase it will be. It has made it through two other case reviews, one of which that's a full tower to publish Monday. There was at least one thing (if not more) that made me keep the water cooled system in this one. Superb case, I couldn't be happier with it.
gcwebbyuk's Avatar
Am about to buy a 120.2 rad to go in the bottom bay to add to the reserator as it doesn't quite fulfil my cooling needs - nearly but not quite
milomak's Avatar
Does this case play nicely with the Corsair H50?
hokiealumnus's Avatar
I don't see why not. Haven't tried one, but it's a 120mm fan hole. You can only go so wrong there.
SecrtAgentMan's Avatar
You got a GPU bracket too eh?

I couldn't get mine to clamp my cards, and it just seemed like a waste of room.
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