CoolingKing

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Very good watercooling kit – Joe

SUMMARY: When you do your homework, the results show – a very good kit.

Kit

The good guys at CoolingKing were nice enough to send me a sample of their watercooling kit, model # CCPS301 to test. This kit is not yet available and they are looking for distribution.

First Impressions

Upon opening the kit and examining the contents, a couple of things struck me right away:

  • Tubing: No skinny stuff here – 9mm ID (~3/8″) silicone
  • Pump: An Eheim 1048 waterpump – first rate
  • Waterblock: Copper with large inlet/outlet nipples
  • Radiator: Large with 120mm fan

Clearly some thought has gone into this to maximize flow rates. Looking at the radiator

Rad

shows that this thing is BIG – the radiator’s footprint is 5″ x 5″ x 8″. It si conceivable that you could hang using the 120mm fan mounts, but you need a fair amount of room inside the case to clear the radiator’s body. What’s also interesting is the manner in which the tubing flows into the radiator:

Rad Top

Note that the inlets straddle each row of radiator tubing – something I have not seen before. This arrangement should cut down system resistance somewhat, although there’s a lot of copper tubing in it.

The pump is a good one:

Pump

an Eheim 1048. The kit comes with a small reservoir and a rubber coupling to attach the reservoir to the pump. Once assembled, it’s a nice, compact unit:

Pump 1

For peace of mind, I would zip-tie the reservoir to the pump.

The half-sphere at the upper left on the reservoir unscrews – use this to fill the system with fluid. The tubing is silicone – very flexible:

Tubing

What you will NOT find in this kit are tube clamps. I assembled and ran the system without clamps and can attest that the likelihood of a tube ever coming off is about nil. Even so, just for peace of mind, I’d use clamps – very cheap insurance.
{mospagebreak}

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The clips include two sets – one for P4 and one for Socket A:

Clips

Note that there are three clips for Socket A – one for each lug. You’ll also see that each clip is marked for CPU loading:

Clips 1

The recommended approach for Socket A is to mount the center clip first, at 12 pounds, then mount two more at 4 pounds each. This gives a total clip force of 20 pounds – within AMD’s spec. The problem I had was that I could not get the 4 pound clips into the appropriate recess – I gave up and used the 12 pound setting for all three (I think you’ll get better performance anyway).

The waterblock is all copper and features large diameter nipples:

WB

There are indents in the top into which the clips rest – this ensures proper pressure over the CPU core.

The interior features a patented design using a “pin and wall” pattern:

In

The pins have serrated edges, most likely to increase surface area and turbulence. There are two kinds of pins in the block:

Pins

The larger pins are used in the center of the block (not pictured here – the larger pins are a newer version which I tested). The base

Base

showed no polishing marks (some discoloration) – I could not feel any marks. Looks like a good job.

Finally, I should mention that the kit contains four LEDs for those who wish to add lighting effects.

Overall, at first blush, the CoolingKing looks promising!{mospagebreak}

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The Test

I assembled the kit for Socket A use to mount on the CPU Die Simulator. I only used the silicone tubing – I did not use any 90 degree bends nor the short length “spring” tubing included with it.

CoolingKing Test Results

Watercooling Kit

Die Temp

Ambient Temp

Delta

C/W

CoolingKing, 74.5 watts

38.6

20.9

17.7

0.24

Delta = CPU temp – Ambient Temp
C/W = Delta / CPU Watts

Interpreting C/W: For every watt (CPUw) that the CPU
consumes, the HSF will limit the CPU’s temperature rise to (C/W x CPUw)
plus the temperature at the HSF’s fan inlet. For example, at an ambient temp of 25 C, a C/W of 0.25 with a CPU radiating 50 watts means that CPU temp will increase 50 x 0.25 = 12.5 C over ambient temp, or 37.5 C. The lower the C/W, the better.

Die Simulator results place the CoolingKing in the top rank of watercooling kits tested to date (Heatsink Ranking).

The fan is agreeably quiet – it turns at a leisurely 2200 rpm. I measured its noise at 59 dBA 8″ from the fan’s intake. Inside a case, this fan will be less noisy than most 60mm CPU fans.

CONCLUSIONS

Looks like CoolingKing did their homework – this kit delivers very good performance and is worth a serious look. As I mentioned, CoolingKing is looking for distribution and if interested, drop them a line. As this is an early sample, the final product may be slightly different – we’ll keep you posted.

Thanks again to CoolingKing for sending this our way – as a new entrant on the watercooling scene, we wish them the best – at least they’re off to a good start!

Production Version Test CONTINUED page 4…

Email Joe

The good guys at CoolingKing were nice enough to send me a sample of the production version of their watercooling kit, model # CoolingKing CPU Watercooling Kit to test. This kit is available from CoolingKing directly and they are looking for distribution.

One major difference in this version is a new design of the water channel:

WB New

The previous version did not have the four large pins at the center.

Pins New

Using beefier pin should enhance heat transfer somewhat.

According to CoolingKing, the other differences are as follows:

Radiator

New type of “Y” connector which increases waterflow.

Note: I had one problem with the radiator as shipped:

Rad

It appears that the in shipping, the intake/outlet pipes were pushed down into the radiator’s tubes. The resulted in a dent in the tubing – this is a packing issue that is easily resolved.

Water Block

1. New type of glue and improved gluing process.

Inside

2. Modification of the cover construction.
3. Improved the brazing quality.

Clamps and Clips

1. Flatten the end of spring frame of the K7 mounts.

2. Add rubber pad at the end of P4 clamping level (locking plate)

Clips

3. Added hose clamps.

Coolant

Added Anti-algaecide inside the coolant.

Parts

Note also that LEDs are included for lighting effects.

Pump

the pump includes a very easy to mount reservoir, making a neat, compact package.

The Test

I assembled the kit for Socket A use to mount on the CPU Die Simulator. I only used the silicone tubing – I did not use any 90 degree bends nor the short length “spring” tubing included with it.

CoolingKing Test Results

Watercooling Kit

Die Temp

Ambient Temp

Delta

C/W

CoolingKing, 69.5 watts

38.8

22.7

16.1

0.23

Delta = CPU temp – Ambient Temp
C/W = Delta / CPU Watts